WD-40 & Silicone Spray. When is one better over the other?

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That's not what I said.
And I notice that you failed to address *any* of the substantive points I raised. I wonder why that is...
I've demonstrated that you were completely wrong on every count. And now all you can do is complain about my tone.
So be it.

*Pretentious* gasbags. And I haven't been uncivil to you. Sarcastic, perhaps, but not uncivil.

Anyone else hear the sound of a punctured gasbag sputtering?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@truetex.com says...

Your humiliation is a self-inflicted wound.
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2006 13:59:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Forget it Doug. Kinch is a well known usenet kook. He'll also tell you that WD40 is perfectly safe to drink, even though it states on the label "Harmful or fatal if swallowed".
His rational for that? If you don't breathe for several hours after drinking it, it won't hurt you.
CWM
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Holy Crikey wrote:

Hi, Silicon or Teflon based sparay. Never WD-40!
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Holy Crikey wrote:

The "WD" in WD40 stands for "Water Dispersant", which is what WD40 primarily is, not a lubricant. It's mostly kerosene with a small percentage of other added petrochemicals.
Use a drop or 2 of light oil to penetrate between the moving surfaces, and wipe clean so it doesn't attract dust.
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Ether Jones writes:

It says "lubricates" on the can.
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But does NOT say for -how long-.
K-Y jelly lubricates,too. ;-P WD-40 has a tendency to gum up after awhile.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Well MOST people draw the line at margarine, you kinky bastard! ;o)
-zero
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It's your own dirty mind that led you to that conclusion. 8-)
Soybean cooking oil would be a better lubricant for *mechanical things* than WD-40.(castor bean oil used to be used in autos!)
So would kerosene.
--
Jim Yanik
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Hmmm, For a while until it dries up and induce rust and what not. WD-40 is not lubricant, it is water repellent/solvent. It makes metal bare. water drops will lubricate for a while as well.
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Holy Crikey wrote:

I've read that silicone oil can cause problems by being incompatible with any oil already in the bearings, and it's better to use regular light machine oil (5, 10, or 20 weight). Another person said that sewing machine oil isn't good because it's vegetable oil (so it won't stain clothes permanently). Only the bearings are supposed to be lubed, not the nylon wheels or the tracks. If your door runs on pivot hinges instead of tracks, then aerosol grease is supposed to be the best. This grease is mixed with a liquid solvent that evaporates after it's sprayed on, and auto parts stores should have it because it's used for door hinges and latches.
I once had a squealing speedometer (metal cylinder spinning in nylon hole). I cleaned the parts with degreaser and applied silicone oil -- still squealed. Cleaned again and tried WD-40 -- again no help. Another cleaning and two drops of light machine oil -- no more squeaks, ever again.
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Neither. Try oil.
WD40 is NOT a lubricant and silicone spray is not intended for metal.
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Silicone oil is intended for metal and vinyl and leather and rubber and plastic and wood.
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Holy Crikey writes:

Don't be a sucker. "Silicone" spray, such as the Gunk brand you buy at Home Depot or the auto parts store, is *not* silicone. It is a few drops of silicone oil in a bulk of petroleum distillate, which is to say, not significantly different from WD-40. Read the label or MSDS, and you'll find that silicone is the last ingredient on the list. Actual silicone oil is expensive, so you won't find it in a big can for a few bucks.
Here is an example:
http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&idp07009
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On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 22:54:59 -0500, Richard J Kinch

I take it you've never played foosball.
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snipped-for-privacy@truetex.com says...

You appear unaware that there are thousands of different compounds which can be distilled from petroleum, and *all* of them can be referred to as "petroleum distillate". Educate yourself here
http://www.protectall.com/artmyths.htm
where you can learn about the many different chemicals that fall under the generic heading "petroleum distillate"
and here
http://www.wd40.com/Brands/pdfs/msds-wd40_aerosol.us.pdf
where the MSDS for WD-40 shows that its composition isn't even remotely similar to that of Gunk Silicone Spray Lubricant.

Copied verbatim from the back of a can of Gunk Silicone Spray Lubricant, p/n AMS9-14, that I have in my garage:
"Contains petroleum distillate (CAS# 142-82-5), propane (CAS# 74-98-6), Dimethyl polysiloxane (CAS# 63148-98-6), and water (CAS# 7732-18-5)."
Doesn't look to me like silicone is "the last ingredient on the list." Maybe it does to you.

From the fifth line under "Brand Information": "Date Entered:     1996-09-03"
Do ya think that might be just a little bit out of date, that the formula might have changed some in the last TEN YEARS??

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Doug Miller writes:

Actually, it is. Industrial chemists use various nomenclatures for the same things, in an attempt to obscure what's going on.
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snipped-for-privacy@truetex.com says...

Actually, it isn't. The nomenclatures are different because they're describing -- gasp -- different substances.
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Doug Miller writes:

No water on the can on my shelf, or in the MSDS. Having found a pointless counterexample, you win the prissy exception contest.
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snipped-for-privacy@truetex.com says...

Oh, I get it -- any example that proves you wrong is "pointless".
Face it, Kinch: you're wrong (again).
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