wd-40 for fluorescent light fixture sockets

I have some horizontal flourescent light fixtures that have sockets to accept horizontal bulbs with 2 pins at each end. in trying to replace the bulbs, the bulb pins are stuck in the sockets.
would it be useful, and also safe, to spray wd-40 into the sockets before inserting the bulbs?
best, Aaron
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Head to your local auto supply place and get some of te dielectric grease(white sff in a smal tube or a vinyl pouch) that is used for spark plug boots and bulb connections in cars. One tube will last you forever, its a good lubricant and conductor.
Remember that WD 40 is essentially kerosene with perfumes. Eventually it will gum up, attract dirt and dust, and possibly interfere with good electrical contact.
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Jim McLaughlin

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Jim McLaughlin wrote:

Conductor of heat but an insulator electrically.
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Steve Kraus wrote:

Yes, and perfect for the described use.
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snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net wrote:

Not WD-40 (WD=Water Displacement). Use a dielectric grease. You can find small qualities at an auto parts store. It is cheap enough.
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Joseph Meehan

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dear Jim & Joseph: thank you for your quick replies. I have gone ahead & purchased the DIELECTRIC product from Autozone. $3.95 for a small tube. Pep Boys had it only in the larger size for $9.00. best, Aaron
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snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net wrote:

It's OK, but generally it's safer to use silicone-based lubes around plastics since mineral oils will damage some types, such as vinyl (PVC). Here's a web site that can tell you which chemicals are compatible with various materials:
www.coleparmer.com/techinfo/ChemComp.asp
Any dielectric (electrically insulating) characteristic of the oil or grease doesn't hurt electrical conduction in this application since the metal pierces through the film. This is why it's perfectly acceptable to apply grease to car battery terminals before installing the clamps to them.
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