WAY OT: Leftover food

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Went to Red Lobster the other day and had Chicken Alfredo which was yummy. Had to make a mad dash and leave early. Had the dinner put in carry out container, paid, then left. The wife forgot to put it in the fridge that evening. It sat out all night on the table, sealed in the plastic container wrapped in a bag, on the table until I noticed the next morning. I put it in fridge anyway. Thus, it sat for about 12 hours.
Think it's ruined? Would you eat it?
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On 12/31/2015 12:02 PM, Meanie wrote:

Toss it in the trash. I'm thinking it'll give you food poisoning at this point.
--
Maggie

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DOG FOOD. If they wont eat it, it's really bad!
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On 12/31/2015 01:02 PM, Meanie wrote:

i wouldn't eat at red slobster if it was free.
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On 12/31/2015 1:11 PM, Gator wrote:

LOL.. I like this answer.
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Likewise. I wouldn't eat at RL at gunpoint.
FIRST and LAST time I ate there, the sides were served ice cold, and the "lobster" was overcooked. Good thing I was a guest. No way would I pay for such garbage.
nb
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 13:02:10 -0500

Best way to find out, Eat it, wait five days and report back the result. Thanks for your understanding.
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 13:47:16 -0500, burfordTjustice

I'm sure I would. Cooked food keeps better than raw food.
I eat food that's been left out all the time, and I only get sick once in a while. Maybe by coincidence, the last time was this past Monday night. Vomited, lay down for a couple hours, vomited some more. No fever, but dreamt I'd swallowed the 3 little boxes in the upper right corner of a Windows computer screen and they were too wide so I had a pain in my belly all night. Even when I woke up the next day, after I was awake I was still planning to go to the computer and do something about the boxes until I figured out it was a dream.
Not hungry all day, vomited again 26 hours after it all started. Then I felt better, but wasn't hungry for another 5 hours.
My ex-girlfriend who normally shows no concern for my welfare makes an exception for ladders and unrefrigerated food, which she thinks I should avoid, expecially since at age 69, she thinks I'm less likely to recover from food poisoning. I'll admit that this one lasted 26 hours instead of the usual 8 or 12.
I also bought a little peach pie, that was half price at the supermarket, and was 3 days old, the last day to be sold accordign to the label. I was busy and didn't start on it for 3 days, and even though I hadn't lifted the cover, it already had mold on it, in 3 places. I looked at the label and sure enough, no preservatives!! I cut the little moldy parts out and ate the rest over 3 days. That didn't bother me a bit, shouldn't bother anyone, but it worried her.

AFAICT, it takes 2 days. 5 days and everything has passed through your body anyhow.
Started Monday night. Didnt' eat anything special monday but Sunday I think I took some seafood salad, with sashimi and crab juice in it, upstairs to eat there and didn't put the rest in the fridge for an extra 4 hours. I'm surprised that mattered. Usually 9 hours is not too much. Maybe there was crab meat and maybe it spoils faster?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foodborne_illness
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Per Meanie:

No way.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Thursday, December 31, 2015 at 2:14:55 PM UTC-5, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Two opposing questions, but only one answer given.
Depending on which question the "No way" is applied to, we'll get 2 very different outcomes.
Is it hot outside? Should I wear a jacket?
Yes.
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Per DerbyDad03:

Mea Culpa.
SHB: "Probably and no way".
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 12/31/2015 1:02 PM, Meanie wrote:

Ruined.
Hell, no!
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On 12/31/2015 11:02 AM, Meanie wrote:

Are there any spots of green that aren't parsley? Personally I'd eat it unless it smelled too ripe.
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On 12/31/2015 2:37 PM, rbowman wrote:

The majority rules. I think it'll be fed to the trash.
Thanks all
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Per Meanie:

For some reason I've got it in my mind that bad fish is especially dangerous compared to bad meat..... but when I think about, it does not seem logical.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 12/31/2015 03:11 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

iirc, the OP said it was chicken Alfredo. I'll leave it to him to explain why he orders chicken at a seafood restaurant.
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rbowman posted for all of us...

That was my thought too, extra salmonella?
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

I have that feeling too. But maybe it's just that fish spoils faster.
There's something that goes on with beef where they age it, keep meat for weeks before they sell it. It tastes better and they charge more. I'm not referring to smoked, salted, or spiced as preserving.

It could certainly be true. If the germs that hang out around fish are worse than the ones that do around meat.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foodborne_illness
Problems that sound unique to shellfish (not fish):
Shellfish toxin, including paralytic shellfish poisoning, diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, neurotoxic shellfish poisoning, amnesic shellfish poisoning and ciguatera fish poisoning
Tetrodotoxin (fugu fish poisoning). Wasn't fugu the centerpiece of a Columbo episode, and isn't it a fish that is almost never eaten in the west?
"In the United States, using FoodNet data from 2000–2007, the CDCP estimated there were 47.8 million foodborne illnesses per year (16,000 cases for 100,000 inhabitants)[48] with 9.4 million of these caused by 31 known identified pathogens." It's amazing there are so many restaurants and food stores and so few cases of disease.
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wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beef_aging
........ Dry-aged beef Dry-aged beef is typically not sold by most supermarkets in the U.S. today, because it takes time and there is a significant loss of weight during the aging process. Dry-aging can take from 15 to 28 days, and typically up to a third or more of the weight is lost as moisture. This type of beef is served in higher-priced steakhouses and by select restaurants. Dry-aging can be done at home under refrigeration by three means: open air, with the presence of salt blocks, and with the use of a moisture permeable drybag to protect the meat while it is aging.
When dry aging using a moisture permeable material, surface mold growth is not present, flavor and scent exchange within the refrigerated environment is not a concern, and trim loss of the outer hardened surface is measurably reduced.[1] The flavor and texture profile of the beef is similar on all dimensions to the traditional open air dry-aged results.
Wet-aged beef Wet-aged beef is beef that has typically been aged in a vacuum-sealed bag to retain its moisture. This is the dominant mode of aging beef in the U.S. and UK today. It is popular with producers, wholesalers and retailers because it takes less time: typically only a few days and there is no moisture loss, so any given piece of meat sold by weight will have a higher value than a dry aged piece where moisture loss is desired for taste at the expense of final weight.
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On 1/1/2016 7:00 AM, Micky wrote:

You do realize meat and poultry differ? Eating raw meat is not as harmful as eating raw fish or poultry where bacteria grows much faster. In fact, fancier restaurants serve raw meat called "Tartar" but a restaurant WILL NEVER serve raw fish or poultry and they are required by law to have the warning notice on the menu about consuming raw fish and poultry can cause food borne illnesses.
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