Way OT: Fort Hood

Page 1 of 3  

It's hard to resist repeating these two observations from a recent news article:
"It's remarkable that Hasan [the shooter] would encounter more return fire from a typical Texas Walmart than he would at the home of the United States 1st Cavalry Division."
"My husband's safer where he is in Afghanistan. At least there, he can shoot back!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

All I can say is it's too damn bad that the cops that shot him had a little better aim. If they did we wouldn't have to spend tax dollars on a trial to defend that muslim piece of crap!
If I have offended anyone with my description of him that's too damn bad! This PC bullshit will end up destroying our country.
Gordon Shumway
What color do Smurfs become when they hold their breath?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

at least the trial will expose a lot that would be otherwise not revealed about Muslim terrorist attacks in the US. Fox News Online right now has a piece about how Hasan's Muslim faith has only been mentioned 29% in news reports.
the part I am unhappy about is how the foreknowledge about Hasan's anti- American Islamist beliefs were ignored by those who -should- have booted Hasan out of the military,if not sticking him in Guantanamo.All the people who were in a position of responsibility to act and didn't will NOT be kicked out or punished in any way;this is all going to get swept under the rug...once this cools down and is forgotten. Then it will be "business as usual",in the "progressive" PC manner of operation.And it will happen again.
Victor Davis Hanson has a great piece at National Review on how this Muslim terorism has been occurring on average abouit every 4 months.Good reading!
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is certainly a familiar pattern of media complicity in the ongoing, never ending Obama campaign. I hope everyone recognizes the parallel between the media's efforts to suppress information about radical extremism in this case and the case of Obama's ties to radical extremists Wright, Ayers and the others on the seemingly endless list of undesirables that our fearless leader aligns himself with. There were warnings about Hasan that were suppressed and the soldiers at Fort Hood paid the price. There were, and continue to be, warnings about Obama that were and are being suppressed and we will all end up paying the price. We are witnessing a "fundamental change" in our country facilitated by the use of organized propaganda. Truth, honor, integrity have become relative concepts and are as irrelevant as the constitution in the minds of those whose smile at us and lie to our faces as they lead us into the pit.
We do indeed live in dangerous times. Hopefully we will all awaken before it's too late.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
k wrote:
in

What a dribble!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I agree with you on that but there are a lot easier ways to get information if we wouldn't give the criminal more rights than he gave the victim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gordon Shumway wrote:

I agree. Water and a plank come to mind...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

Not to confuse you with the facts- but Andre was not an "unlawful enemy combatant". [a term the created in 2006 to fit a need] He was not a civilian. He was a spy. His trial was not perfunctory. It was a lawful trial by an Army court. Washington, as head of the Army confirmed the verdict, and stuck by it through some appeals.
Hanging was how spies were punished in the 18th century.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

over a century but not spefically mentioned in either the Geneva Convention nor the Hague Conventions. It was sort of holding area for those nobody knew quite how to classify. Doesn't really make any difference in your point, but it is not just a term made up post 9-11.
--
To find that place where the rats don\'t race
and the phones don\'t ring at all.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

I don't know how widely used it was. I spent a year in Vietnam - about 1/2 of it in a Battalion communication center & we dealt every day with mothers and kids trying to kill Marines. We called them civilians- and treated them as such if captured. Sometimes, in the heat of the moment they would be killed. Then we called them Viet Cong, for the most part.
I don't doubt the term was floating around before 2001-- but I'd love to see a cite.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

See Hey Bub's post about the Supremes using it. You only asked for one cite and I am really lazy so I shall defer to him (grin).
--
To find that place where the rats don\'t race
and the phones don\'t ring at all.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

From what I've read, Washington put a lot of effort into making sure that prisoners were well treated...he was pained and angry at the abuses inflicted by the British, who often slaughtered prisoners. I believe Washington also sent a high-ranking officer to bring Andre to where he stood trial.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Agreed. "Unlawful Enemy Combatant" is a fairly recent coinage to include all those who do not wage war openly. It includes spys (such as Major Andre), saboteurs, guerrillas, fifth-columnists, Democrats, and the like. UEC as a designation (sort of) did not come into use in 2006, as you suggest, but rather was used in the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court (Ex Parte Quirin) in 1942. There, the court said:
"Lawful combatants are subject to capture and detention as prisoners of war by opposing military forces. Unlawful combatants are likewise subject to capture and detention, but in addition they are subject to trial and punishment by military tribunals for acts which render their belligerency unlawful...an enemy combatant who without uniform comes secretly through the lines for the purpose of waging war by destruction of life or property, are familiar examples of belligerents who are ...offenders against the law of war subject to trial and punishment by military tribunals."
Andre WAS tried, as you remember, by 14 general officers
But as for appeals by Major Andre, the only "appeal" that took place was his request to Washington to be executed by firing squad rather than hanging. Washington declined Andre's request.
Andre was captured September 23, 1780. He was convicted on September 29th, and was hanged on October 2, 1780.
From arrest to execution: nine days.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sigh. We've had this discussion several times. There is no concept in international law of "Unlawful Enemy Combatant". The 4th Geneva Convention, signed by the United States in 1949, guarantees the rights of all persons in hands of a occupying power.
As for our major, he is a US citizen who committed an ordinary crime (mass murder) in the United States. His rights are guaranteed by the US Constitution. If they are not, all officials involved are in violation of their oath of office. -- Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Douglas Johnson wrote:

Correct. The various international protocols and conventions DO define a critter they call a "Lawful Enemy Combatant," (carries arms openly, wears a uniform or distinctive insignia, etc.). Solely by extension, if one does not conform to the definition of "Lawful..." it is reasonable to conclude that person is an "Unlawful ..." Further, the U.S. Supreme Court did categorize the German spys as "Unlawful..." and I suppose that's mainly how the term got into common use.

He can be BOTH a criminal murderer AND a UEC. Just like, if deemed a murderer, he can be tried by a) The military, b) The federal court system, or c) The state of Texas. Being one does not preclude also being the other.
As for his "rights," if he is deemed a UEC - and it is solely a discretionary designation by the president - he may have only those the president is willing to allow. The president's Article II powers place anyone designated an UEC at the unfettered discretion of the president. His ONLY remedy, as the federal courts have held, is "that the president be replaced at the next election."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Maybe you should read it again.

sorry,but data is showing this was an act of Muslim terrorism. His PowerPoint presentation,the money trail to Pakistan,and his emails to Al-Qaida.
You're in denial.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Let's not glorify this crime. Simply a deranged mind with access to weapons. That the derangement was helped by islamic idiots doesn't make it deserving of holy war connotations - it still is a criminally insane act of mass murder. By a psychiatrist, no less. The profession (such as it is) has some cleaning up to do.
Again, just y opinion, YMMV.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

There are crazies in every profession, and mental health probably attracts a few more than others....molded by personal experience. A lot of cops were junior hoodlums who evaded prosecution but still like guns.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Could you point me at appropriate section and paragraph numbers? The only exception I've been able to find is citizens of nations that have not signed the convention. What are the others?

I can't think of anything I am in denial about, but that's the nature of denial, isn't it? So specifically what? He may have been motivated to commit terrorism, but it was still an ordinary crime. In fact, terrorism is an ordinary crime by the same penal code.
Yes, I know terrorists are out to kill us. Some are Muslim, some aren't. I have faith in our Constitution. I believe it has survived far worse threats and is perfectly capable of protecting all of us while serving out justice to those that need it.
-- Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What is the punishment due a traitor in time of war?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.