Way OT Baling wire?

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No type of combine uses wire. Combines harvest grain. Hay and straw are baled with a baler.
Here in central Indiana, at least, it's pretty common to see wire-tied hay. Don't think I've ever seen wire-tied straw, but then, we always bought our straw from the same farm, and he had a string baler.
You'll probably get much more detailed answers over at misc.rural.
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On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 23:18:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I would not go so far as to say no type of combine uses wire or twine. I know of several combines fitted with balers on the straw outlet that drop baled straw right out of the combine. They didn't leave the factory that way, but have been operating in the fields that way for quite a few years.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

Not, exactly, the bales come out of the baler _attached_to_ the walkers outlet of the combine...so I'll still say the combine doesn't use it. :)
W/ the advent of cellulosic ethanol and stover-fired generation plants there's a lot more of this sort of thing altho for those applications generally small bales aren't the ticket because of transportation so what they're doing/trying is pulling a 4x6 square baler behind instead of trying to attach a small square baler.
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Colbyt wrote:

Why would they call it "baling wire" for heaven's sake if it wasn't for baling?
String tie is cheaper but whoever baled those may simply just have a wire baler or prefers wire just as we have folks who want net wrap and others that don't on rounds.
SW KS, wheat primarily...
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Colbyt wrote:

When I was young I saw them both. Wire lets you pack a tighter bale, which let you load and store more. Rodents won't cut it, and it won't deteriorate as plastic can. But it's hard to dispose of, can kill an animal if ingested, and needs gloves.
Wire costs a lot more. Nixon applied price controls in 1971. By 1974, the supply was running out, and many balers needed wire. The price tripled.
Lowes has probably found that they can charge an extra 40 cents without losing sales. With wire, they need less space and bales are less likely to break.
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Combines do not make bales.
Commercial operations use wire-tie balers because the wire does not rot when the bales sit stacked on concrete. Mice and rats do not chew the wire.
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Also, the plastic of tie string doesn't get into wool.
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Nonny
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I'm your age and I was seeing baling wire used as teen in CA. I'm no baling expert, not having spent time on a farm since I was a kid, but I know I've never been without a roll in my tool box in over 45 yrs. You can still get a roll in almost any automotive store. I hadda dig out that roll and jury-rig something as recently as a yr ago. Don't leave home without it! ;)
nb
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wrote:>

Bailing wire is the old farmer's version of duct tape. It's properly disposed of by placing it over a fence post, after breaking open the bail. <grin>
Re: the straw disperser. I saw a guy who walked into one when it was whirling. It flattened him like he'd been hit by a truck. No lasting damage, but he claimed that he never had to part his hair again.
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