Way OT Baling wire?

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I bought 2 bales of straw at Lowes for a seeding project. Surprise the bale was bound with baling wire and not string. I am 60 years old and never seen baling wire used and I worked on the farms a lot as a youngster.
What type of modern combine uses wire? Is it a regional thing?
I am curious.
Colbyt
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On 4/20/2010 3:48 PM, Colbyt wrote:

I've seen it used, in the past 20 years, in the west.
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Here in Southern Utah, the ranchers used so much of the baling wire that when they took it off the bales, they tossed it in piles to keep their stock from becoming entangled in it. I have seen piles of it larger than four pick up trucks, and ten feet high. At first, I couldn't tell what they were, so got out of my truck to go investigate. I do not know if they sold it for scrap, or, like any rancher, didn't throw anything away. On some ranches, there are four to six of these humungous mounds.
But I, like you, thought that they used twine now instead of wire, probably for cost considerations, as well as safety for the stock.
Steve
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Used to be used here in Idaho years ago was mostly abandoned when they came out with sisal then plastic twine cows got "hardware" disease from ingesting scraps of wire left in the hay

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On 4/20/2010 4:44 PM, Larry Fisk wrote:

First of all, it is not a combine that tied it, it was a baler. Here in SE Iowa there are a few individuals that still use wire rather than string.
Don
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For you and Doug.
I appreciate both the replies.
We don't raise much wheat, oats or the like here. Or if we do it is well beyond my 40 year ago experiences.
Excuse my ignorance. I thought combines stripped the seed from the harvest and then baled the straw; an all in one process.
Do they discard the straw which is then baled by a different baler? A regular hay baler. That seems somewhat more labor intensive than I would have thought modern farm machines would be.
Two of the replies are close enough to Ky for me to accept that what I bought from the BORG was not really all than unusual. Just something I had I had not seem before.
Oh well the wire will come in handy for all sorts of home repairs. -:)
Colbyt
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Nope. They strip the grain, dump it in a hopper, shear the stalks off, and spew them out the back.

That's often not relevant. Come harvest time, the emphasis is on getting the grain harvested and on its way to market as quickly as possible. Baling the straw as the wheat is harvested takes time and manpower away from the much more important task of harvesting the grain. There's plenty of time to come back and get the straw later when the wheat is taken care of.

You can buy that wire by the thousand-foot spool at places like TSC.
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On Apr 20, 7:49pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

A lot of folks won't bale the straw at all, preferring to turn it under to improve the soil. I depend on the few who will, for animal bedding & tree mulch, fortunately I have found a few grain farmers who will round bail straw. For what it is worth I prefer the string, the mesh seems to always get caught under the bale & then becomes part of the ground & takes forever to break down. The wire is handy for repairs, as a companion for duct tape, but is rare these days.
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On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 19:50:44 -0400, "Colbyt"

I do some farming myself. Balers bale hay and straw. Combines strip the seed from crops like corn, soybeans and oats. I have never seen a combine that can do both, but I only do small scale farming with old machinery. Some of the new machines (which cost a million dollars) can do anything and everything. Heck, they now have GPS operated tractors that are supposed to be able to plant and harvest crops without the farmer even steering the thing. I guess they still require the farmer to be in the tractor in case something goes wrong. Good grief, I'd hate to think of one of these 50 ton machines losing control and destroying people, livestock and buildings.
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Oh, tractor. I thought you were talking about Janet Reno, and a bunch of tanks, around a Christian retreat in Waco TX.
"Go destroy the compound, Hal." "Sounds like a good idea, Dave."
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Christopher A. Young
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Usual practice here in wheat/barley country is for the combine to cut and thresh the grain. The straw is put out the back of the machine into 'straw spreaders', just a couple of big whirling blades that spread it out behind the machine. If the straw is to be baled later, the straw spreaders may be removed to leave a swath of straw or if they are not removed then a side delivery rake puts it into swaths for the baler.
Plastic twine is a real problem. It doesn't deteriorate and thus lays where you drop it for years. People who run sheep do not want to use it as it gets in the wool and renders it unsaleable. _Most_ people using twine tied bales are careful to retrieve the stuff and dispose of it properly but I had a neighbor that just let it drop and lay there. His barnyard was pretty much of a 'yellow lawn' from all the ends stickign out of the mud. I also recently hit a piece at another farm with my chainsaw which promptly wound up in a big, snarled ball around the drive sprocket and in the chain. Didn't even try to clear it until I got home.
Harry K
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Ooops, forgot.
Now that straw is being used for fuel and building panels, a change in procedure has occurred. The combine cuts the grain as high as they can (trying to get just the head and a very short stem), that is followed by "swathers" that cut the standing stubble right at ground level and lay it in a swath for the the baler.
Harry K
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wrote:

Or the combine can dump the straw directly into a towed bailer.
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wrote:

true, I just haven't seen that out here. The current practice where straw is baled seems to be 'leave high stubble and swath it'.
Harry K
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wrote:

Some examples, in case anyone is interested:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RWGrpZP37A
http://hoursnotmiles.com/2010/agco-challenger-officially-reveal-new-combine-biomass-baler-combination /
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On Sun, 09 May 2010 08:52:35 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

dealers at the time) were mounting balers to the back (mounted right to the combine frame) of White and Massey combines back in the late sixties/early seventies. I think they did a couple John deere units as well, but I'm not sure (I worked for a White dealer at the time)This was before the big bales were common - and it would spit roughly 70 lb bales of straw out the back like water-melon seeds.
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Since the last time I was on a farm to see this done, late 60's, that makes me not feel like a complete MO.
I am willing to admit that it might have been a baler towed by a combine but I swear standing wheat went in the front, seed was loaded to a hopper and bales were pooped out the back.
So, thanks for your post.
Colbyt
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On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 15:44:24 -0600, "Larry Fisk"

That's what cow magnets are for, but I guess they don't work all the time.

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Larry Fisk wrote:

I thought there were magnets "cow magnets" given to cows to swallow to catch any kind of steel/iron?
TDD
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chinese straw
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