Waterproofing for work gloves?

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I work in the rain a lot....
What is the best way to keep work gloves from getting soaking wet?
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What trade and why are you wearing gloves?
For the cold and still being able to feel, I prefer the brown jerseys. Buy a dozen or two. Nothing nicer than changing into fresh warm gloves. Keep the cold, wet ones somewhere that they can dry out.
If things are really wet and you don't need to feel, get rubber gloves. Not the ladies dish washing gloves, the kind used by glass setters and guys that work in chemicals.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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"DanG" wrote in message

I am cutting/handling large heavy wet wood logs in Oregon where it rains, rains, rains. Also various construction work outside.
So wearing gloves to keep hands warm, protect hands from "wear and tear", and when using a chainsaw I use special chainsaw protective gloves which are not waterproof and will get wet - then my hands get cold.
It doesn't get real cold around here (maybe 20's sometimes, rarely in the teens) , so typically leather gloves will work if they are dry. Rubber gloves are too thin (cold) and I don't think they would last more than a day with me wearing them. (I wear out gloves quickly.)
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Hi Bill, There's no solution and even if they are waterproof, water will drip/run in from the wrist. I was a construction worker in Holland and now a farmhand in Canada. When they get wet anyway, but no real mechanical wear, I use close fitting deerskin gloves $20 that I oil with vegetable oil, not soaked in oil. That will keep them warm/dry most of the day and the oil smoothes your skin a bit, over those I can wear work gloves, leather/cloth 3 dollar a pair, take those off as soon as and let them dry again, use several pairs and oil them too, that makes it easier to start with just dried ones. The exhaust of the chainsaw will heat those up nicely in one minute. Real wet work, cleaning/unfreezing water troughs in winter, I use chemical gloves, all plastic, and they last about 2 months. As soon as I don't need my hands, I use felt gloves, made for oilfield workers $20, they take some abuse, are very warm and can be worn over the deerskin ones or just bare hands. Yes you always have bulky pockets or one part of your tool belt is stuffed, but warm hands are nice J
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"The Bald Ass Prairie farm" wrote in message

Thanks! That is a great suggestion. Vegetable oil is inexpensive and will not contain nasty chemicals. I'll try it...
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Veg oil is said to go rancid. I'd use a mineral oil instead. Baby oil is the cheap stuff, if you can stand the scent. Of course, I've heard that that deteriates the leather... I guess you can't win. ;)
Another thing to consider is finding a pair of wool "undergloves". Wool stays warm even when wet, by all accounts.
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(Bill) says...

Try Huberd's Boot Grease (made in Carlton) which is a beeswax and pine tar compound. Buy good quality Gore-Tex lined leather gloves, put them on and dip into the Huberds. Work your hands like you are washing them, paying particular attention to the backs of the gloves, then take them off and LET THEM DRY at room temperature. It will take at least a couple of weeks. You will then have a pair of leather work gloves that will keep your hands warm for several hours. Two pair will do you all day. Let them dry at room temperature when they get wet, and grease lightly when they start to dry stiff.
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Bill, I would sure look at something like these: https://www1.fishersci.com/Coupon?gid 8161&cid42
I hate wearing gloves and will only get them out for hot or sharp or cold. I need to feel what I do, commercial contractor/ carpenter and get frustrated with the gloves, so I get them large enough to be able to get them on and off easily. I cannot imagine you wearing out good rubber gloves any faster than wearing out leather gloves. These are not your mother's Playtex gloves.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Bill wrote:

They make very tough neoprene gloves on a fiber base that will last a long time. They are not thin. I've used them as a young man working as a laborer-- shoveling, digging trenchs, carrying iron, etc. Never had one tear. I'm not talking about those thin things that allow you to feel a or the president on a dime.
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rains,
tear",
are
the
day
I've had luck wearing the disposable latex gloves inside the real work gloves. Hands stay clean and dry, other than a little sweaty.
aem sends...
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Sprinkle some baby powder inside the gloves before you put them on. It makes them easier to peel off, too.
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Have you tried wearing surgical gloves under your leather gloves? (You know, the kind your doctor and veterinarian buys by the box? IIRC, they cost about $12 for a box of 100 pairs.)
I put a pair of surgical gloves on under my welding gloves when I have to arc weld something while standing in water or standing out in the rain. (It keeps you from getting shocks when the leather welding gloves get wet. Standing on a piece of woods helps, too, if you aren't knee-deep in salt water or something.)
Jan
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Dry and waterproof are mutualy exclusive. If they are waterproof then you will seat all in the inside anyway.
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I used to have a pair of neoprene (like a wet suit divers wear) gloves that worked fairly well at keeping my hands warm in wet weather, but you will sweat in them and get damp.

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On Sat, 12 Nov 2005 19:52:51 -0800, scott21230 wrote:

Isn't that the purpose of Gore-Tex? It sure works for boots and other clothing.
--
Keith




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That's the purpose, but it doesn't work when it's raining. If it's raining, then the relative humidity is pretty close to 100%, which means that moisture inside the garment won't be able to diffuse out. So, if it's raining, you're still going to be pretty damp if you're perspiring on the inside.
Kelly
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On 14-Nov-2005, snipped-for-privacy@ptdcs2.intel.com (Kelly E Jones) wrote:

Given that immersion tech Goretex works underwater, I have a problem with the claim it doesn't work when it's raining.
Goretex and other waterproof breathables work on insensible perspiration. That means that the perspiration is in the form of water vapour. If you are sweating so much that the sweat is in the form of drops, it is going to stay on your skin or whatever is under the Goretex. The problem in that case isn't how the fabric breathes, but how much heat you are producing.
Mike
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Works for what? Keeping water out? Sure, I'm not arguing that.

Not sure exactly what you mean by that. Of course we're talking about water vaopour, not liquid water. Goretex is permeable to water vapor, which means water vapour can diffuse through it. Water vapour diffusion through Gore-Tex is governed by the same laws of physics as all other diffusion is, which means that diffusion goes in the direction of high concentration to low concentration. If the concentration of water vapour outside the glove is the same as the concentration of water vapour inside the glove, then no net diffusion is going to take place.
Kelly
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On 14-Nov-2005, snipped-for-privacy@ptdcs2.intel.com (Kelly E Jones) wrote:

Letting vapour out.

Except that there can be a temperature differential across the Gore Tex membrane. That will assist the diffusion even if the concentration is the same.
Mike
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Kelly E Jones wrote:

I suspect that if Goretex is wet on the outside, then it has a layer of water over it, and the fluid acts as a vapor barrier to prevent vapor inside from leaving.
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