Waterproofing a brick foundation

I have a very leaky basement. The house was built in 1937
and the foundation consists of 2 courses of brick that were never
coated with anything. What is the best way to waterproof it?
My plan is to dig it up, clean it and coat it with a coating of
mixture of Type M Portland, lime and sand. Considering screening it
Before the cement ( or do you think that's overkill). After coating it
with hot tar. I will put a perforated drain in before backfilling it.
Comments or other options appreciated.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com (Jeff) wrote in wrote:

The original poster mentioned that they were going to parge the wall first, which would provide a smooth surface for application. Parging the wall is sufficient for bituthene or similar products (given it is allowed to properly cure prior to membrane application). It is NOT recommneded that you use a polymer modified foundation coating as a base for the application of pre-manufactured membranes. The polymer additive may cause outgassing which would affect the adhesion of the membrane and possibly cause degradation of the membrane.
The product is not that difficult to apply. The bigger headache would be having to re-excavate to put on a true waterproof barrier.
The purpose of the primer is NOT the same as the tar. It provides no waterproof characteristics and is only intended to facilitate initial bonding of the membrane. The horizontal weight of the back fill renders the long term adhesive properties of the primer moot.
The point was that you have to put on a true waterproof barrier that does not degrade over time and remians elastic enough to span any cracks that exist or may develop over time.
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ThoroSeal.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Help keep down the world population...have your partner spayed or neutered.
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wrote:

Once again Thoroseal is not appropriate as it does not retain any elastomeric properties. It is also not appropriate under constant hydrostatic head as the primary waterproof barrier. I have never seen it spec'd for subgrade exterior waterproofing by professionals.
Even the makers of Thoroseal do not claim that is elastomeric.
If you're going to do it, do it right.
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That may be. But there's sure a lot of rework being done out there...original work done by the 'professionals'.

Never had any problems with it.
Have a nice 4th weekend...
Trent
Help keep down the world population...have your partner spayed or neutered.
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wrote:

Not having had a problem with it does not mean it is acceptable use of the product. Yours is one instance. I have, however, had to re-do work where Thoro-seal has been used on exterior below grade. Thoro-seal is a very good product when used on the correct application. Coating an exterior, sub-grade foundation is not a proper use and the advice to use in lieu of a product designed specifically for the purpose is irresponsible. I would suggest that the original poster check with an architect or building engineer rather than be confused by the misinformation offered on this group. Also check with the AIA for acceptable foundation waterproofing methods. You will not find Thoro-seal as one of them.
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