waterproof

Trying to add a coating to OSB flooring. I am thinking of applying water downed water resistant carpenters glue, as a shield. Paint might be better ??
greg
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On 1/18/2011 11:10 AM zek spake thus:

Well, why are you trying to "waterproof" it?
I put the word in scare quotes to point out that waterproofing something like flooring is damn near impossible.
So apparently you're expecting water to get on the flooring. (And you do mean subflooring, don't you? Although I have seen OSB used as finish flooring, sanded and varnished, and it looked really good.)
Maybe you should concentrate on keeping water from getting there in the first place.
Anyhow, would help to know more about your situation.
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Explain what you are trying to do and for what purpose if you want a meaningful answer.
R
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I got 5/8 OSB over 1/2 foam flooring. I will have a little bit of rug over foam, over OSB. I will also have some other stuff in other areas, laminate, ceramic. Just in case somebody spills some drinks. I can see plastic sheet under the laminate. Plastic sheet would help, but would not ventilate if water got in. I guess the OSB already has a glue component. Just buffering it up. I got load bearing sites. The non load bearing sites will be covered by OSB and 2X4 strips for the 2X4 studs attached to the OSB.
What it looks like so far...
http://www.zekfrivolous.com/misc/basement.JPG
greg
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wrote:

I got 5/8 OSB over 1/2 foam flooring. I will have a little bit of rug over foam, over OSB. I will also have some other stuff in other areas, laminate, ceramic. Just in case somebody spills some drinks. I can see plastic sheet under the laminate. Plastic sheet would help, but would not ventilate if water got in. I guess the OSB already has a glue component. Just buffering it up. I got load bearing sites. The non load bearing sites will be covered by OSB and 2X4 strips for the 2X4 studs attached to the OSB.
What it looks like so far...
http://www.zekfrivolous.com/misc/basement.JPG
greg
I hope that isn't a load bearing telepost in that pic...
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Your talking about the telescopic post, right. I got it pushing up the floor to try to even out a dip. Its straight up and down really, from the wide angle looks slanted. There is going to be a wall there.
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On 1/18/2011 3:34 PM, zek wrote:

OSB is not a wearing surface. Traffic paths or any point loads will shred it. Go buy a vinyl remnant you can stand the pattern of, cut to fit, but don't glue it down, just put transitions at the doors, and maybe edging along wall to keep it from curling. That way, if you ever decide to put a real floor in there, you can take it back to bare OSB in a few minutes.
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On 1/18/2011 8:36 PM aemeijers spake thus:

Maybe, maybe not.
A friend owns a building nearby in Oakland, an older commercial building with businesses downstairs and a couple of living units and studios upstairs. He and his partners had it renovated probably 20 years ago. One of the kind of experimental things they did was using OSB as finished floors upstairs.
I wouldn't have believed it, generally disliking OSB as I do, but the floors are beautiful and they've stood up to a lot of traffic very well. They were sanded and varnished. Probably 3/4" or 1" boards.
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4 -5 coats of polyurethane should be pretty good for a wearing surface.. But, I will not have a wearing surface. I think I WILL use oil poly when the weather warms up. I'm not in a hurry for that.
I would have used plywood, but I'm cheap, and 3/4 inch is too heavy. I also did not use tongue and groove after long thought. I also did not put finished side down as recommended.
greg
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Buy a gallon or two of the cheapest polyurethane floor varnish you can find. It soaks in well, is waterproof and durable, everything you want. It will likely be oil based, and quite odoriferous, but with suitable precautions worth the trouble.
Joe
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I have worked with oil and water based. I did think of that, mostly vapor problems right now in the winter.
greg
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?

Glue is not a water proofer. It will give minimal protection and under a puddle with break down. Use paint as it is intended for that. I bet you see more painted houses than glued houses.
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