Water Table...

Greetings.
I live in a developed suburban community (at the apex of the area grade) and I'm having some trouble with water in my basement. I've installed excursion drains and directed water away from my home but have a question; how does one determine the water table on a parcel of land?
My house is 150 yrs old - is this the kind of record that's kept by municipal gov't?
Many thks, in advance, for advice...
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Dig down.
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Get a post hole digger, the type that you turn with a cross handle as it goes into the ground, not the style with two halves that you bring together. With one of those and some extension pipe added on, you can dig a hole probably 15 ft deep or so, certainly deep enough to determine if the water level is above or below your basement level. Of course, that assumes you live in an area with reasonable soil, not on a mountain full of rocks.
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No, I don't think it will be a matter of municipal record. Contact a local well drilling company, they can test but will probably already know the answer.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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My county, a rural Oregon county, keeps a record of all wells, year drilled, depth, water table, etc., year closed or abandoned.
Your milage may vary...
Beachcomber
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On Fri, 01 Apr 2005 02:39:46 GMT, not snipped-for-privacy@xxx.yyy (Beachcomber) wrote:

Wells go down to potable water. Ground water is probably another layer entirely. I would go with the post hole digger idea.
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The water table would be an issue before you built a house. Now that the hosue is there, you can;t change the water table. It is what it is.
rusty
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Another way to figure it out would be to use a couple of lengths of 1/2 plastic pipe connected up to a water hose to basicly hydro bore your way down 15 ft or so. Then just leave the pipe there for a few days, until the water level reachs it's natural level, which you can measure with a string and small weight.
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Many thks for advice.
Is what it is, but before I install a new driveway as remedy, I'm trying to understand scope of problem as best I can. Asphalt won't address b'smt leak if water table is pushing up against seam (leak is at seam of floor & wall).
I'll be watching it rain today...
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If it is just the seam grind it out and remortar then seal the area. Those are 2 different pours that are common to leak. Drill through the floor and take a sample in different areas and wall to, dig out some dirt with a screwdriver if it is wet you will know easily.
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