Water softener and soap in shower

Page 1 of 2  
I installed a water softener several months ago and since then I notice in the shower that I feel that the soap doesn't fully rinse off of me. Is this normal with water softeners? Does this mean my wateris TOO soft?
Should I use a different brand of soap, like Zest, that promotes no soapy feeling?
Thanks!!
Eddie G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To start, let's get a technicality out of the way. There is no such thing as "too soft". There is though, less hard. There are different degrees of hardness, but it is either soft or some degree of hardness. Just like a lamp can be dimmed or brightened, it can be "too off". It is either off or on.
The soap is rinsing off. What you feel is your very clean skin, not coated with minerals in the water. Some people like that feel, others don't. For those that do not, they adjust the softener to do a less than good job or mix in some hard water, defeating the purpose of the softener to start with. Personally, I like the slick feel of clean skin, but if you have never had it, it can be a little strange.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed,
How do you adjust the softener? My softener removes hardness by releasing sodium and sequestering calcium. There's no control over this, it removes calcium as long ass it has sodium, I think. Do you rig a bypass so some hard water is mixed with the output of the softener?
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Martel wrote:

My softener has a setting that is based on the hardness level. Depending on how hard the water is, the higher I can set the softener. It is a Waterboss if you are familiar with that brand.
Eddie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Martel wrote:

My softener has a setting that is based on the hardness level. Depending on how hard the water is, the higher I can set the softener. It is a Waterboss if you are familiar with that brand.
Eddie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/02/06 10:48 am Eddie G wrote:

I have a WaterBoss. If I understood the manual correctly, the hardness setting merely determines how many gallons of softened water you can use before it regenerates. AIUI, as long as the thing is not overdue for regeneration (i.e., as long as you did not tell it that your water is softer than it really is), the water it supplies will be as soft as the device is able to make it.
Perce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

The hardness is one of the 3 parts needed to correctly set up a softener. The other parts are the salt dose and how much water is used daily.
This may help: http://www.qualitywaterassociates.com/softeners/sizingchart.htm also use the calculator page link at the bottom to se how it all comes together.
Gary Qualty Water Associates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Martel wrote:

To my knowledge, there is no provision on any softener to mix hard water with softened water. You would have to do so in the plumbing. I do not suggest doing this.
Ion exchange does not sequester, it removes the positive charged ions in the water with negative charged sites on the resin beads. As those ions are removed, two much smaller and weaker positive charged sodium or potassium ions are released into the water. The sodium is added at the rate of 7.85 mg/l per grain of 'hardness' removed. A slice of white bread usually has 120-160 mg of sodium, a glass of V8 has 560 mg. Softeners remove more than just calcium and magnesium (hardness minerals); such as ferrous iron, lead, copper, manganese etc.. Water is either hard or soft and the hardness varies in all waters.
If a softener is sized correctly and set up correctly, the softened water will be 0 gpg hard every time you use any volume of water (in gallons per minute flow); otherwise the softener is not working correctly and there's little sense in using/having it. The vast majority of people like the feel and get used to it in about 3 weeks, then they really hate the feel of hard water when they go somewhere that has hard water; or if their softener breaks.
Gary Quality Water Associates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary Slusser wrote:

What about this: http://www.triangularwave.com/f7.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eddie G wrote:

They sell PWT (physical or magnetic water treatment) equipment and compare it to water softeners. Their equipment does not remove anything from water unless they include mechanical filtration like carbon etc. In only very few commercial/industrial cases does PWT/MWT work, it especially doesn't work in residential applications.
Gary Quality Water Associates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary Slusser writes:

In only works in fantasyland.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 01:04:42 -0500, Richard J Kinch

It works alright in preventing the formation of lime in the water pipes and nozzles. Very strong and large permanent magnets align the dissolved mineral crystals to retard mineral deposition. The magnets cannot be sized down economically for a household system. It does not soften water as the minerals are still there. The London Imperial College lab tests were published in a New Scientist article more than 20 years ago. The tests were commissioned by the Swiss manufacturer of the magnetic system who couldn't give a scientifically acceptable explanation for their product.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Now there's a shock -- the only "evidence" supporting the supposed effectiveness of this system came from a study commissioned by its manufacturer. Imagine my surprise.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh pshaw, on Sat 02 Sep 2006 08:14:29a, Gary Slusser meant to say...

I hate the feel of softened water. I had a softener installed for 7 years and, while I got used to the feel, I never liked it. I appreciate the advantages of using soft water for appliances like the clothes washer and dishwasher. If I were able to do so, I would install a softener for those purposes only. As it is, I cannot easily alter my plumbing.
--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Maybe it'll help to get some store-bought water, take a a cup-full, and pour it into your hair, rub it around, and then over your body.
Might get that slippery feel out.
I hope it works ...
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 02 Sep 2006 14:39:53 GMT, "David Martel"

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I believe setting the softener to regenerate less frequently would make the water less soft. I recently moved into a house that has a MacClean softener with a maximum capacty of 30k grains. The family that lived in the house previously had the softener regenerating every 4 days which is probably overkill since I'm the only person living in the house. How would I go about testing the water to determine the hardness and iron content in order to determine the proper setting? There is a bypass valve on the softener. To get an accurate result do I need to bypass the softener and let the water run for a few minutes before I take a sample? Or should I just drain some water from the holding tank. The house uses a well pump/pressure tank setup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Smith wrote:

If you don't get the amount of hardness set correctly, the softener can't work right; kinda like having a bad fuel gauge in your vehcile. Sample at the well pump pressure tank. Then check this link: http://www.qualitywaterassociates.com/softeners/sizingchart.htm
Gary Quality Water Associates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Go to http://www.lifesourcewater.com/comparison-chart.html and read under the "water softener" column. It says the water is not good for drinking, plants, or pets. Is this propaganda to sell you their own system?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eddie G wrote:

And if you believe what they say, you'll eventually be buying a bridge to nowhere. The site bends a lot of well known truths and then they mix in their idea of the truth.
Their main product to replace a softener is a very over priced filter to remove chlorine and tastes while it contains a PWT (physical/magnetic water treatment) anti-scale/descale device. It does not remove hardness, iron, maganese etc., so it is not a softener or a replacement or one.
Gary Quality Water Associates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Softened water *is* bad for plants. As Gary noted, water softeners operate by replacing calcium and magnesium ions in hard water with either sodium or potassium -- both of which cause soil to become hard by decreasing its permeability to water. And that makes it hard for plants to get the water they need. Use hard water on your plants.
People who are on sodium-restricted diets should avoid drinking softened water also -- even if the softener uses potassium instead of sodium.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.