Water Shutoffs: Knob vs Lever

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The ball valves you have are the best for flow. Probably you have a clogged up aerator screen (on the end of the faucet). Take it apart and clean it. That may solve your problem. --Phil
Doug Kanter wrote:

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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No. Brand new faucet. The problem existed from the moment it was installed, and the previous faucet had the same problem. The screen has been checked in the new one.
Youngstown State University

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Assuming the valve and faucet are good then you have a restriction in the pipe to the sink. Do you have galvinized steel pipes? I would expect this to happen in that kind of plumbing eventually.
The 90 deg elbows seem to form the most rust inside from what I have seen replacing my pipes for repairs. >50% rust fill in is typical of my old pipes. Fortunatrely this house hasn't had any pinhole leaks yet. I do have an interesting jackhammer like cavitation going on in a Tee near my kitchen sink when I turn the hot on too much.
Youngstown State University

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All copper, from meter to sink, except for a new set of flexible hoses for the last 18". I have steel drain pipes for the bathroom. I don't even wanna talk about those - I already have a headache. :)
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I'm stumped unless the new hoses are the "flood safe" kind. In which case they may have tripped and you need to briefly remove them from the valve to reset.
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PipeDown wrote:

Just had to replace one of those 'flood safe" connectors with another non-flood safe flexible connectors on the toilet. It seems like it got a bit of dirt in it, caused some water hammering, and then slammed shut. I was surprised how fast the toilet filled with the regular flex connector. Apparently, the flood safe valve, or the washers with small holes that came with it, limited the rate of flow.
Lena
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Newer faucets are required by law to limit MAX flow. I would call moen and ask them. There MIGHT be a quick easy fix like removing a flow restrictor in a shower head.
Beyond that try connecting a temp hose at the sink bypassing the faucet and check that.
some of those flexible hoses have a very smaii inside dioameter, that may be contribuiting
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Side note: After my divorce, I was in an apartment for 2-1/2 years. It drove me crazy. I kept telling friends "I gotta get outta here - I need a garden, and I like working on my house!" Be careful what you ask for, ya know?
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Another thought, if the faucet does not purposely have a built-in flow limiter, maybe you have a problem like I had with a Delta faucet. It had a diverter thingy to supply the hose most of the flow when flow to the hose was started. Removing that produced more flow through the faucet itself, although it obviously cut down the hose flow. --Phil
Doug Kanter wrote:

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Hi, City water? Well water? In my house regulated pressure is 60 psi. No such problem. Wonder why you're suspecting the shut off valve? Maybe you don't have high enough pressure to begin with.
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City water. 120 lbs before regulator, 55 after.
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try turning your pressure up just as a experiment to 80 pounds
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No, quite the opposite actually. Are there service valves under the kitchen sink? I'd look to them to be falling apart inside if they are not the quarter turn kind. The lever "ball" valves you refer to are the absolute best kind to have anywhere in the system.
--
Steve Barker


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