Water seeping in through wall

Hi All,
I am a newbie to home repair so please bear with me if I don't get all the terminology correct.
Description: My kitchen wall, which is facing the front of my house, has three huge windows. The house is built on a slab. The point where the wall meets the slab is 7 inches below where my kitchen floor meets the wall. [The outside of this wall is all brick.]
The problem: On certain days when it rains water seeps in where my kitchen floor meets the wall. Interestingly, it doesn't necessarily happen when we have a lot of rain. I checked the roof, the gutters etc. No issues there.
Whats even more interesting is that if I go outside and look at the wall, the ground near it does not look very wet - water is properly getting drained away from it. However, while water is leaking, if I go spill a bucket of water on the ground near that wall - I see this water seep through my kitchen wall.
My remedy: I noticed there were gaps where the wall meets the kitchen floor - so I *filled* those gaps up with silicon caulk. The next time it rains I doubt anything can come through.
This got me thinking though, that for the water to rise 7 inches from the ground *through* the wall till it got to the gaps and spilled into my kithen - is quite a feat. Also now that I have sealed the gaps the next thing thats going to happen is the water is just going to rise higher and higher through the walls (instead of spilling through the gaps) and probably ruin my walls .... Is this an accurate assessment ?
I understand that this is probably a grading issue and I need to grade the land such that water does not collect near this wall. But I really don't know how to do this and in my naive opinion the land actually looks well graded. Of course when it rains a lot, I don't know how grading can help, the water is going to end up in the ground and rise upwards.
What I have done for now, is that I have dug a hole right next to the wall, about 5-6 inches deep and the next time it rains I am going to observe how water collects in this hole to determine if it is truly a grading issue.
If anyone has any advice - please let me know. Any tips on grading; redirecting the water; sealing the wall where it meets the slab; anything ...
Thanks much, roubles
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It sounds like you have a major problem.
Brick veneer walls are not waterproof and are not meant to be waterproof. Proper flashing of brick walls is essential. The waterproofing is on the exterior face of the stud wall and should be designed to turn the water out at the bottom of the brick wall and flow away. Anything that prevents this from happening must be corrected.
Do some reading about weep holes in masonry construction. I assume you mean that the bottom brick on the outside is 7 " below the finish floor. There should be some holes or deliberately left out mortar head joints in the exterior brickwork, well below finish floor. Water that can get out of these holes from inside the wall must be able to get away from the house. You may need to dig a ditch around the house or some other Herculean effort to allow surface water to have an avenue of escape.
You describe large windows. I would sure look into flashing details around these windows (not unusual to done incorrectly). sadly, the only proper repair involves removing the brick veneer, fixing the problem(s), and reinstalling the brick veneer.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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I didn't quite understand, but is the ground outside higher than the level of your kitchen floor by 7 inches?
It sounds like you have a good understanding of the problem and know what to do about it.
If the ground is higher, then it *should* be lower and sloping away from the house. This is not always possible though.
There are all sorts of solutions. The wall below grade can be coated with a tar like stuff, gravel can be placed near the house with a drain pipe at the bottom of the gravel. The drain pipe can go to a drywell, storm sewer, or sometimes may need to go to a pump. Here are a few links to get ideas...
http://www.boomenviro.com/drainaway/panel_drains.htm
http://www.homewiringandmore.com/building/footingdrainage /
http://www.toolbase.org/tertiaryT.asp?DocumentID 63&CategoryID02
"Roubles" wrote in message

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Double check your measurements, I seriously doubt that your kitchen floor is 7" above the soil level outside the house if a pail of water spilled there will seep onto the floor.

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you can buy, or make a thing called a water level. this sort of thing is perfect for this type of application. heres the first example that came up in a search engine : http://www.factsfacts.com/MyHomeRepair/WaterLevel.htm
randy

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This happens only when water is already seeping through. That is, the ground is already saturated with water due to the rain.
cheers roubles
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