Water pressure regulator

I was told recently I should have a water pressure regulator installed as my pressure is too high.
We live in a two story house and some of the faucets on the second story seem to have low pressure (or low flow rate.)
My questions are.
Will the faucets and shower-heads that have low pressure on the second story get even worse after a pressure regulator is installed?
If the low pressure or flow rate on those faucets is due to the fact that they are old and corroded I can see how the issues we're having with those may not be affected by a pressure regulator.
Thanks.
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How high IS the water pressure? You can buy a tester at Home Depot. If you mess with cars and have a compression tester, you can stuff the rubber end in the faucet and check it. Or, how's the flow at the downstairs faucets? It's easy to test the upstairs faucets, just turn off the angle valve and disconnect the pipe and check the flow right at the valve. If it's an old house the angle valves could be stuck or you may cause a leak. Old pluming is always something better off left untouched:)
If you lower the pressure, the water flow is going to slow down. That's a given. Some of the new "low flow" faucets are really slow. The school I work at has some that flow about a quart a minute. Cuss them every time I fill the coffee maker.
Al
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Big Al wrote:

When I travel, I carry my own shower head that has been drilled out. When I want to get clean, I don't want to use a shower that sprays water like one you might find in a motor home. "Don't dribble on me" should be our new patriotic slogan. Thanks Congress for screwing up the county's plumbing.
TDD
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Big Al wrote:

(for a 10 ft elevation difference) only 4.3 psi. Not enough to make much of a difference.
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engwar wrote:

If the pressure regulator is set higher than your low pressure on the second floor it should not matter.
--
Claude Hopper :)

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wrote:

I would beg to differ. If he has low pressure/flow rate on the upper floors, he has some kind of flow restriction leading to that floor. Anything he does to lower the pressure where the service enters the house is going to lower the flow rate of the water he gets on the second floor.
I'd suggest following the advice to buy a simple screw on pressure tester at a good hardware store, HD, etc. Then you'll know what the pressure actually is. Who told you it was too high and how high was it?
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