Water Pressure Range Question

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I seriously doubt that all of the various websites that state a "range" are concerned with limiting the phone calls to the water authorities.
In other words, I don't think that that is the *reason* they use a range instead of a hard number.
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..
Well, then you don't agree *100%*, now do you? ;-)

Except that 60 is 50% higher than 40, so that's quite a difference.

You mean like me? ;-)
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I seriously doubt that all of the various websites that state a "range" are concerned with limiting the phone calls to the water authorities.
In other words, I don't think that that is the *reason* they use a range instead of a hard number.
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You have a good point. The phone calls would be to the regulator company's tech support. "I set my regulator to 50# but it creeps up to 53#. Should I return it? "
There is NO reason to state a particular pressure because it is virtually impossible to hit consistently and is not needed. I run a shop with boilers, compressors, machinery, pumps, and more, and none give anything more than a range because that is the practical way things work. We have hundreds of regulators and gauges and they all vary under most conditions.
The Space Shuttle may have tighter numbers. Your blood pressure does not. Ask your doctor what normal heart rate is.
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Also, different homes could have different needs. If it's a new house everything could work perfectly fine at 45PSI. If it's an older home with less than perfect piping, or has say a lawn sprinkler system that is having difficulty reaching some area, then 60PSI could help. Since any pressure within a reasonable range is OK, I don't see why recommendations should state a fixed number. If they did, how about people whos's system is set to say 45 see the recommendation for 55 and decide to go screw around with the pressure regulator. Maybe in the process, creating real problems....
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On 1/4/2011 10:01 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Every Watts water pressure regulator I've installed was factory set to 50psi. I imagine water saving plumbing fixtures use 50psi as a standard for calculating water flow. If you want a bit more water out of your nanny state shower head, I suppose adjusting the water pressure higher could help. :-)
TDD
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On 1/4/2011 10:32 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

or drilling out that little plastic washer in there..... whoops, did i say that?
--
Steve Barker
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On 1/4/2011 10:56 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

When I've traveled, I have a shower head and tools in my luggage. Not air travel mind you but road travel for service calls and installations. I was usually able to change the shower head in a motel room to my pre- drilled unfettered shower head without much trouble. I don't like running around inside a shower trying to get wet from the little sprinkle. :-)
TDD
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