Water Pressure Range Question

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This is more of a discussion starter than a real "I need an answer" question.
If you Google around, you'll find that many sites list "normal" residential water pressure as a range, mostly 40 - 60 PSI.
For example, this is typical:
"Water pressure in the District typically ranges from 45 - 125 psi; however, typical residential systems are designed to function best under a pressure of 40 - 60 psi. If the water pressure entering your home exceeds this level, you should install a pressure regulator in the line to reduce the pressure to an acceptable range.
Why say reduce it to a "range"? Why not say "Adjust the PRV to reading of 55 PSI" or "60 PSI".
Is there really no noticeable difference between 40 PSI and 60 PSI?
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There is for me. We're on a well with a storage tank located about 250' away and 100' below the house grade. A 5 stage booster pump set to output 65 psi at the tank level results in about 40 psi at the entrance to the first floor of the house, less after distribution throughout the first floor and even less on the second floor.
Would love to have 60psi at the house entrance, but that would involve replacing the booster pump with a very expensive 8 stage booster pump or installing a second booster at the house.
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Something does not compute. Psi of 65 should only be 22 psi at 100' rise...some less than that after the loss through 250' of pipe.
Harry K
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And no flow=no water being used so your point is? Static pressure is pretty immaterial in a water system.
Harry K
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How can static pressure be immaterial if problems caused high static pressure is the reason PRV's are recommended if the street pressure is above 70 PSI?
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I assumed (I know) that that would be read as "after" a PRV is set up.
Harry K
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??? Do you have a point that is unknown to everyone already? To make it clear. I know what a PRV vavle is and what it does.
BTW the PRV does reduce pressure even at static. Case in point was my town down in a canyon. They built a new reservoir up on the rim. Blew fittings all over town _even when no water was being used_. Also my mothers house when I installed the PRV there. Reduced pressure to 55 psi _static_.
I repeat - static pressure is pretty meaningless in the operation of a water system. It is what it does _dynamically_ that counts.
My original system here was from a commuity well over a 1/4 mile away. Static (30/50) was just fine, dynamic wouldn't run an impulse sprinkler.
Harry K
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WTH is that mish mash supposed to mean?
Simple. Pump fills pressure tank no matter where it is. Pump shuts off at cut-off pressure. That is the STATIC pressure. Open valve and water flows with DYNAMIC pressure dropping. It does that whether it is a pumped sytem or feeding from a reservoir. What the DYNAMIC pressure is determines hwo well the system works.
You are talking to a peson who has fooled with and cussed these systems for 60 years including being the unpaid maintenance man for our community well. No longer, I had a well drilled here to get off that community one because I wanted otu of the maintenance bit AND WANTED A DYNAMIC PRESSURE tha would run a sprinkler.
You keep coming up with weird posts that really say nothing.
I repeat again: Static pressure is not the criteria for system operation. It is a beginning point and that is all.
If you care to refute it go ahead but all you are doing is dancing around it. Harry K
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BTW no power on a pumped system does _not_ mean mean instantly no water. I suggest you discover what the pressure tank is for.
Harry K
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No shit? Odd, that figure has been known for hundreds of years or more. Did you just find it out?

Well, no shit Dick Tracy. The Russians have a saying for such "Look, he just discovered America" which is about a sarcastic as it can get.

Which I pointed out in my first post. Which you somehow either missed or decided to argue about.

Since you just repeated what I have been saying since the beginning of this idiotic diversion... Did I perhaps educate you to the point you can regurgitate it? My whole point in this is that you keep saying things that everyone already knows and adding zilch to the thread.
If there is any misunderstanding it is on your part. My posts were clear to anyone older than 9.
I see you didn't address your error in saying that no electricity results in instant no water.
Now if you can go back through the thread and quote _anything_ that shows I don't understand what I am talking about feel free. I won't hold my breath.
Harry K
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"Simple. Pump fills pressure tank no matter where it is. Pump shuts off at cut-off pressure. That is the STATIC pressure. Open valve and water flows with DYNAMIC pressure dropping. It does that whether it is a pumped sytem or feeding from a reservoir. What the DYNAMIC pressure is determines hwo well the system works".
It is not the static pressure. The pump is stopped or static, but that's something else.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluid_statics#Hydrostatic_pressure
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So the pumps shuts off at say 50psi. Gauge on system with no flow says 50 psi. That is the static pressure. I read, rather scanned, the article. Nice PhD dissertation...has very little practical application in plumbing systems. Now if you can explain how the 50psi on the gueage with no flow is _not_ the static, hydyrostatic or whatever pressure, have at it.
You still haven't explained your "no electricity means intant no water" - it doesn't if there is a pressure tank in the system.
Harry K
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<snip a bunch for bandwidth>

Horse shit!
Talk to any "mechanic" who deals with hydraulic systems and ask him what static pressure is. Static pressure is that containined in a system at rest whether provided by gravity, pump, or thd hand of God. Here are a couple dictionary definitions. Oddly they fit what I have been saying and show what you are trying to pull is wrong.
---------------------------------------------- static pressure nounPhysics. the pressure exerted by a fluid that is not moving or flowing.
Science Dictionary static pressure The pressure exerted by a liquid or gas, especially water or air, when the bodies on which the pressure is exerted are not in motion.
------------------------------------ Note that the definitions don't give a rat's ass what is supplying the pressure.

Now that is laughable! A presure tank will contain an air "bubble" that is compressed plus a water volume. I can draw at least 5 gallongs of watter out of mine when the power shuts off. Larger tanks will have even more of a reserve.
I suspected you didn't know anything about pressure tanks and you just proved it. The only thing you got right was the purpose of the tank - to prevent 'short cycling" - another trade term you need to learn about. You might study up on just how that air bubble accomplishes that. While doing so, look up "pre-charge" and how to set it.

Know it? Of course I do as does anyone dealing with hydraulic systems. It is why those systems work.
Harry K
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60 psi is hardly stressing the plumbing. The booster pumps we use (Goulds Aquaboost IIs) are rated to output up to 100 PSI as are the water system service lines. And because we live in an area where power can go out for extended periods of time, we do keep a 50 gallon gravity feed tank of emergency water in the garage along with two 5 gallon jerry cans. Have used them more than once!
I hate low flow / low pressure showers and have been known to modify the showerheads accordingly.
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Yep. Normal recommedned range for residential is low of 40psi to high of 60. They figure anything above 60 is both not needed and does stress fittings.
Where pressure regulators are required they will usually be set around 50. Well systems witll be set cut on/off 40/60 or 30/50. I am at 30/50 and find that some impulse sprinklers do not operate well at the 30psi end. Too lazy to adjust it.
The booster pumps we use (Goulds

Heh! Just went through most of a day with power outage. Very high wind storm - even had gusts into hurricane range - started in the evening. I _knew_ the power would go out sometime so I went around and got out flashlights, candles, etc. Did I remember to draw some 5 gal buckets of water to at least flush toilets with? Nope. Had to run to town the next morning to even have water to make coffee with (wood stove).
Harry K

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On 1/5/2011 10:41 PM, Robert Neville wrote:

I don't think Stormin Mormon meant you are stressing the system, just that your system is complex, so it would be a good idea to have some extra water on hand. That's how I read it anyway.
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That's definitely true. I manage the water system for a 28 home mountain subdivision. It consist of 8 wells, storeage tanks and booster pumps. Most of the properties get a pretty good service, but we have a few that need some tweaking. Every year we put a notice in the newsletter that reminds people they need an emergency backup for water.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Hi, You can't regulate pressure to a specific number at all times. Our house pressure is fluctuating from 50 to 70 psi or so depending on what is going on in and around the house. Bathing, Laundry, sprinkler, etc. We have a afjustable pressue regulator.
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re: "You can't regulate pressure to a specific number at all times."
But I can regulate *static* pressure to a specific number, therefore if a specific number were stated for the maximum recommended pressure after the PRV, it would only go down from there when fixtures are in use (dynamic pressure) except for the occasional rise when water heater cycles, etc.
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?

Not a big difference. If they stated a particular setting, people would go nuts trying to achieve 50 psi and complain if it dropped to 48 psi or went up to 52 psi. Saves a lot of phone calls to the water department that way.
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