water pressure questions?


My house which is 40 years old has 1/2" copper lines for the water feeds. I have a submersed well pump and a bladder tank who's pressure guage reads 30psi. I also have an exchange filter and a cartridge filter in line and I've tested with both of them bypassed with negligible differences. My pump was replaced < 10 years ago and the pressure tank sooner. The pump seems to cycle normally as it has in the past. I've also checked the air pressure in the tank and it is at spec.
My measured flow at several faucets is now at 1.6 GPM and I have noticed a reduced pressure/rate over the past year.
So, my questions to those who know - what/where can I look or do to diagnose and/or improve this situation? I am reluctant to bring in a contractor at this point because of economic reasons. What might my options be?
Thanks all.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Normal system pressure is usually in the range of 45-65 or so. You can adjust it via the pressure switch that is typically located at the bladder tank. Easy to find, just follow the wiring. Usually there is a diagram under the cover that shows the adjustment screws and process. Mine has two spring loaded screws. Adjusting one moves both the cut-in and cut-out pressure. Moving the other only affects one, think it's the cut-out, but not sure without looking. You probably want about 20lbs diff between cut-in and out. You want the bladder in the tank pressurized to 2lbs less than the cut-in pressure. For safety, shut off the breaker before doing the adjusting as their are live contacts in there.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 10, 1:26 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Agree; we used cut-in 20psi. Cut-out 40psi. Normally never needed adjusting. Seem to recall replacing switch contacts of pressure switch once in 20 years that we used well water. Didn't have a bladder tank, just plain steel. Maybe OP has broken/perforated bladder inside tank?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Do you have a water softener? That can restrict the flow if it gets gunked up. There is a filter cone on the end of the pipes in and out that you can clean by unscrewing the head. (water off and pressure relieved)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've seen older homes that had steel or iron pipe from the well into the house. That pipe eventually becomes more and more restricted with rust and sediment buildup. In one house like that, the water at the taps was reduced to a trickle, and the owner thought he was looking at replacing all the plumbing in the house. I replaced about 4 feet of iron pipe where it came into the house and all was good.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 10, 10:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Restrictd flow due to obstructed pipes _prior_ to the tank will only be in effect when the pump is running. It won't effect anything if the pump is off as the pressure tank will be providing normal pressure. Reduced flow at all times has to be after the tank.
Harry K
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote Re water pressure questions?:

I would try to tap into the pressure tank output and measure the outflow there. If you get significantly more than 1.6gpm, then you know there is an obstruction someplace after the tank, and you will have to track it down from there.
--
Work is the curse of the drinking class.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.