Water pipe replacement question

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On Mon, 28 May 2012 22:43:14 -0500, Steve Barker

other countries. Likely closer to 15. I have seen meters above ground at street, above ground outside house, and inside houses. I haven't seen them underground at the street - but I guess if they were underground I wouldn't see them, would I?? Just as if they were INSIDE you would be unlikely to see them - unless you purposefully went looking for them. Not knowing where mine is located you could be in my house for a week and not know I HAD a meter unless you searched for it (and got lucky - since you couldn't follow the pipes because, like MOST basement around here, mine is almost TOTALLY finished.
Anywhere frost is common I've never seen one outside above ground. Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI, Manitoba, Sakatchewan, much of BC, Minnesota, Michigan, North Dakota, Idaho, Michigan, northern New York would have at least a large percentage inside. I suspect Kansas and oklahoma would too,.
I've seen ouside meters in Florida, Georgia,Tennessee, South Carolina, and west virginia, as well as parts of Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Italy, saeveral caribean islands and France. A lot of these places don't all have water meters.OPr even municipal water. No water meters in Burkina Faso, Bottswana and Zambia - at least when I was there.
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On 5/29/2012 12:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The very typical arrangement where I live and at least the dozen states around me is indoor water meters. The only time they use an outside meter pit is for the few places that cannot accommodate a meter. For example the cemetery where most of my family is buried has a few frost proof hydrants and there is a meter pit next to the first one.

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On 5/28/2012 11:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

well no, that's obvious. They wouldn't be above ground in an area that has the possibility of freezing temperatures. By "outside" I was referring to NOT inside the house.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 10:42:20 -0500, Steve Barker

more of europe, just for starters.

That's pretty obvious
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 22:43:14 -0500, Steve Barker

You've been to the wrong places. Go to Philadelphia and you can see tens of thousands of indoor gas and water meters. I lived in a row house with 50 houses just on my block. That street ran about 12 blocks. One of many.
Or here in CT where I can show you thousands of them.
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indoors in pittsburgh too. i only saw ONE outdoor meter in pittsburgh my entire life. it was in a deep sump covered by a steel lid when i was a child, at a nearby home...
the frost line is at least 4 feet in pittsburgh, and basements are the norm here
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On 5/29/2012 4:54 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

how the heck did they read them before the advent of the remote dealy ma bobs?
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Steve Barker
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 10:43:03 -0500, Steve Barker

Until last year I sent the town my water meter reading every 6 months. When I bought the house 27 years ago I signed off on the reading the previous owner read. When the guy replaced it [with a basement, remote read type] last year he made a note of the old meter reading. For gas and electric they would estimate if nobody was home to lead them to the basement every other month. I never had one of them so I don't know how long they'd estimate before insisting on seeing the meter.
Jim
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Here in central NJ we have inside water meters. Up until about 15 years ago, I knew the meter reader well. He'd ring the bell, I'd let him into the basement and he'd read the meter. Nice guy.
About 15 years ago they changed the meters and now the meter is still inside but they have a wire that runs outside with a little black plastic thing they put their reader up against.
I haven't seen them in a while and I got a notice that they are going to change these devices so they can read them from the curb. I don't know if they've done that yet.
But the meter itself is still inside.
--
Dan Espen

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Maybe in your part of central NJ, but not here in the parts of Monmouth county where I've lived. Here they are underground, at the curb. I'll bet you're in an actual town. The areas are more rural here.

That's kind of how they read the meter at the curb, except the guy doesn't even need to get out of his vehicle.

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-snip-

That's old school. Mine is wireless. Has a 10 year[25?] battery and is all digital. There is no activity until it senses a light in the room, then the LED? screen shows what is going on. I'm a couple hundred feet from the highway & no one has come up it to 'read' the meter.
Jim
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 10:43:03 -0500, Steve Barker

during the day. Those meters that could not be accessed for reading got a notice in the mail, and the home-owner/tennant read the meter and mailed it in. Just drew the lines on the diagram of the meter to show where the needle was pointing, in most cases.
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wrote:

They've had remote reading meters for at least forty years. Before that, they sent someone into your basement periodically (every month, some years back).
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-snip-

All the water meters I've seen/know about in upstate NY are inside. Most gas meters in older construction are still inside. *Most* electric meters are outside now except for cities.
Jim
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wrote:

Every house I've owned, in the North, the water meter was inside. Even where I grew up, they were *all* inside. Just the idea of an outside water meter, in a cold climate, is plain silly.
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On 5/28/2012 11:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Well here in the Kansas city area, Most all the water meters are outside in a well. They are mostly remotely read from the street also. I have seen one inside in the older part of the plaza area. All the meters are outside in the rural areas. Silly as it may seem, that's the way it is.
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Here in the Willamette Valley, Oregon, the meters are in the ground at the curb, and usually less than a foot deep. It just doesn't get cold enough here to freeze them. I looked up the city codes, and they say something about the frost line here being 12 inches. I shudder to think of a winter cold enough to freeze the ground 12 inches deep, it would be a disaster. We just don't get the cold weather. Rain, yes, OMG it starts raining at the end of September, and does not stop raining until the end of May (it is just now starting to dry out), sometimes the rain continues until mid June. We get about three months of no rain in the summers, and then the rain starts up again. We have MUD nine months out of the year, and ironically we have three months of drought, and by August the forest fires start.
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wrote:

The "wells" sound dangerous. Such a thing only works in moderate climates, too. When we were in Vermont, several mains, down as far as eight feet, broke one Winter. It's not unusual for the frost line to go down 7'. Of course, here the frost line is 6" (that's exaggerated) so a shallow pit (maybe 12") works.
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On 5/29/2012 12:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Most all the meters here in the midwest are set somewhere between 18" and 24". It does get to -20 here, but not for extended periods of time. I seriously doubt the frost actually goes below 36" anywhere in the us of a. To say the frost line goes to SEVEN feet would mean ALL the water lines are buried below that. Is that what you mean to have us believe?
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wrote:

Yeah, when I was in college, we had a mobile home with a pit like that under it. The water meter froze every time it got cold.

You're seriously wrong.

Yes. As I said, even the ones down as far as EIGHT feet were rupturing one Winter. Most are well below that (new subdivisions were easy to spot ;-). The water line came into my house through the basement floor.
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