water level of pipe

i need to measure the water level in a 1/2 " pipe that is buried in the ground. the water is 100 - 150 feet down. i do not want to use an electronic tape. any ideas?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matt wrote:

I assume this pipe is vertical and you have access at the surface. I don't know how accurate this will be, but you could insert a small tube down the pipe, and once you think you have some water, you could clamp the tube and pull it out and measure where the water is.
It'd be like putting a straw in a glass of water, putting your finger over the end, and pulling the water up.
I also wonder if you could use the tube to suck air through it as you lower it down the pipe. I'd think that when the end hits water, you might notice a sudden increase in flow resistance, at which point you could tape or mark the tube and pull out.
The second approach might be more accurate than the first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And if you don't mind getting some chalk in your water, you can have a weight pull the end of some string or wire downward. Blue chalk is rubbed on the line to help easily distinguish wet from dry. The depth from the surface to the top is calculated by subtracting the length of the wet part of the tape from the amount of line lowered into the hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matt wrote:

Drop a pebble and stopwatch the seconds until you hear a splash. You can then use the formula for falling bodies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you need to add a little more detail. Is it a well?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 16 Sep 2006 14:58:23 GMT, "Sacramento Dave"

a HALF INCH well ?????? Thats rediculous......
I dont understand the whole purpose of any of this...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matt wrote:

Take a piece of romex, strip about 1/2" of insulation off the ends of the black and white wires (and cut back the ground wire if it has one.)
Connect an ohmmeter across the other ends of the black and white wires and set it to measure maybe 100K ohms full scale.
Lower the romex into the pipe and when the bare ends touch the water you'll see the resistance indicated by the ohmmeter drop sharply.
You'll be able to move the wire up and down and see the change with a depth accuracy of maybe an inch.
You could do the same thing with a single conductor wire by measuring its resistance to ground.
Thanks for the mammaries! Because, about 35 years ago when I was CE for a company then called "Scully Signal" I designed a "water detector" based on that principle. I left that job about 25 years ago but I just Googled "Scully Water Detector", and by gum they're still selling the damn things. <G>
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Way to go, Jeff. One of the cooler things to have in the "life-time of memories" basket! 8-)
-zero
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a spool of fishing line, a small fishing weight, and a small fishing bobber, the long narrow type. I measured one of mine and it would fit in a 1/2" pipe. If you can't find a small enough bobber, a 6" long piece of 1/4 or 3/8 wood dowel would probably work as well.
Attach the weight to the end of the line, with the bobber a bit higher. Drop it down until it stops when the bobber hits the water; mark the line, pull it up and measure from the bobber to the mark.
HTH,
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.