Water leak at bleeder screws?

Well I turned my front and rear spickets on last week. So I went into the furnace room and utility room and noticed some water. Well it seems both were leaking around the bleeder screw. I shut everything off and dryed off everything. For both I did the winter drain procedure again and took off the bleeder screw completely, screwed it back on real tight. Anyway the rear seems ok, no water signs (but I'm gonna watch it) and the front I'm gonna leave for a few days tolet it dry out and do the same there. If in fact either of them do leak do I just need to replace the bleeder screw or something? They are part of the metal valve assembly but I have the horrid poly pipes in my house. The bleeder has nothing to do with the poly pipes so I can't blame them if it is a leak.
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Well I turned my front and rear spickets on last week. So I went into the furnace room and utility room and noticed some water. Well it seems both were leaking around the bleeder screw. I shut everything off and dryed off everything. For both I did the winter drain procedure again and took off the bleeder screw completely, screwed it back on real tight. Anyway the rear seems ok, no water signs (but I'm gonna watch it) and the front I'm gonna leave for a few days tolet it dry out and do the same there. If in fact either of them do leak do I just need to replace the bleeder screw or something? They are part of the metal valve assembly but I have the horrid poly pipes in my house. The bleeder has nothing to do with the poly pipes so I can't blame them if it is a leak.
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Grendel wrote:

Should be a tiny rubber "gasket" inside the bleeder cap. If you can't find a replacement, make one by cutting up some thin rubber scrap.
Jim
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<< make one by cutting up some thin rubber scrap. >>
An ordinary paper punch works fine for this.
HTH
Joe
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Joe
That is excellent..I have been playing (and getting paid for it) plumber for about 30 years and never thought of that....What a great tip!!!!!!!!!
Vic Plank Lancaster PA
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<< What a great tip!!!!!!!!! Vic Plank Lancaster PA >>
Gracias!
Joe
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Paper punch?
What is that and where can I find that? You mean the paper from a hole punch?

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wrote:

If it's a little cap, there is a rubber insert in it. A plumbing shop should have those little rubbers, or get a sheet of rubber gasket maker, and cut it to fit.
That's how it was on all the older brass valves. I am not too familiar with poly piping, since it's not allowed where I live.
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