Water is way too soft.. what to do?

Page 2 of 2  
Steve,
You lost me at the beginning. Why do you believe that the problems with your water heater are caused by the softener. Anode rods should last for years. Don't know much about them but you may wish to investigate powered anodes.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 08 Aug 2016 18:44:01 +0000, steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Lewis:
Here in New England our water runs too soft for most pool pumps, so a bucket of Hardness Up is required every season here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Find the unit and use the bypass valve. Find the make and model and then get a manual. All of the softeners I have ever had that I put salt into had a method of changing the settings. They even came with a test kit.
Or call a plumber for service to the unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Adjusting the salt dose adjusts the capacity (K grains) of the softener which establishes the regeneration schedule; number of gallons or number of days between regenerations BUT, not the 'softness' of the water between regenerations.
And I'm sorry but, most plumbers (and well drillers), although they should, don't know much about servicing softeners or other water treatment equipment other than that they are installed in the cold water line.... So only call a plumber, or well driller, that knows the equipment or call a water treatment dealer.
Gary Quality Water Associates http://www.qualitywaterassociates.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To make it easier to understand, let's clear up the terminology. Water is either soft or hard. If it is soft, it is soft and it is not more soft or too soft. So now we know that if the water is not soft it is hard. There are, however, degrees of hardness. Sounds like you want to go from soft to some degree of hardness. I've heard your complaint from a few others as they just can't seem to get used to being really clean and not having minerals deposited on their bodies. Feels like the soap is not rinsed off because your hand slides so easily. I'm a bit surprised about your girlfriend's hair though, as mot like the feel and appearance of hair washed in soft water. Years ago, people used to save rainwater for just that reason; washing hair.
The salt is just used as a carrier to exchange ions.
You can read more here http://www.lenntech.com/water-softener-FAQ.htm
Water softeners are specific ion exchangers that are designed to remove ions, which are positively charged. Softeners mainly remove calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) ions. Calcium and magnesium are often referred to as 'hardness minerals'. Softeners are sometimes even applied to remove iron. The softening devices are able to remove up to five milligrams per litre (5 mg/L) of dissolved iron. Softeners can operate automatic, semi-automatic, or manual. Each type is rated on the amount of hardness it can remove before regeneration is necessary.
A water softener collects hardness minerals within its conditioning tank and from time to time flushes them away to drain. Ion exchangers are often used for water softening. When an ion exchanger is applied for water softening, it will replace the calcium and magnesium ions in the water with other ions, for instance sodium or potassium. The exchanger ions are added to the ion exchanger reservoir as sodium and potassium salts (NaCl and KCl).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You might get a better "feel" from the water if you recharge with potassium chloride rather than sodium chloride. It is a little less soluble than sodium, and more environmentally friendly on the discharge. It is, however, more expensive.-Jitney
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Much thanks to all of you. I am tryig to get in contact with the builder for manuals. I will also look for manuals on-line (once I get home and get the make/model of the equipment). After reading all your responses, I may try to "get used to" the soft water as I see it as a benefit now. I do not drink the water so the salt content is not an issue. The womans hair is definately greasy though. I am going to give the water system a good cleaning to make sure there is nothing else in the water that would cause that to happen. She did try to rinse her hair this morning with a bottle or store bought water and her hair was NOT greasy. I will post the outcome after some manual reading. Thanks again!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LOTS of posts in the past have asserted the amount of sodium chloride is NOT an issue. Our softener works for everything but toilets and hose bibs, for 28 years.
On 4 Nov 2005 07:28:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@phr33k.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's most people's experience that while the water feels more slippery, cleaning with soap is more effective with soft water than hard. Your experience seems to be the exact opposite.
As another experiment, get her to try a different shampoo - especially one that's a bit more natural soap based not-quite-so-exotic. As one to try, try Johnson's baby shampoo, and see if it works any better. If it does, it may be something odd about the shampoo she was previously using, and she just needs to look around for something different.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.