water in basement (continued)

Page 2 of 2  


Yes, but you don't want to pump more than you have to. You can't pump a whole underground river out thru a 2 inch pipe. I was respondiing to one of the other posters that seemed to be suggesting solving the problem by just making the sump hole deeper. That might work up to a point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 21:21:54 -0400, Dan Espen

To avoid communication problems in the future: "Water table: the planar, underground surface beneath which earth materials, as soil or rock, are saturated with water."
The other definition says "completely saturated"
So, you don't have an elevated water table when there is rain. You have wet ground, or maybe some more specific term, from which water is entering your house. But the water table doesn't go up with each rain and down afterwards.
Here's more "The American Heritage Science Dictionary - water table The upper surface of an area filled with groundwater, separating the zone of aeration (the subsurface region of soil and rocks in which the pores are filled with air and usually some water) from the zone of saturation (the subsurface region in which the pores are filled only with water). Water tables rise and fall with seasonal moisture, water absorption by vegetation, and the withdrawal of groundwater from wells, among other factors. The water table is not flat but has peaks and valleys that generally conform to the overlying land surface. Compare potentiometric surface. "

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The water under your floor would rather go to the dry area then up through your floor. Its ability to do that will vary with your soil. Drains make it much easier for the water to get to the sump pump.
If you had continual problems, or if you suddenly developed a problem while your neighbors were dry, drains would probably be worthwhile. But since the problem happens every 20 years, I sure wouldn't want to spend $5000 to have them put in. (actually, that sounds cheap and I would be concerned it was too low) In fact, when you have this 20 year even it might flood whether you have drains or not, OR it might not flood whether you have drains or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

By bringing the water up on to the basement floor or by collecting water that is already on the basement floor?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my n'hood, everyone with a below grade basement had to have a sump pump, the law. everyone, in 1979, who had a basement which was at ground level, which in our case was just at one end of the basement (to the back yard), didn't get a sump pump. I don't know if any of them added one.

Where does your utility pump pump to?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Without pictures, it's hard to say for sure, but ti does sound reasonable. Sounds like whatever is happening is gettign worse over time. My only question is to (given the age of the home) if the outside concrete has been waterproffed lately. It probably needs it if it hasn't been done in a long time. I'd try that first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

on to the street.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

Yes, most of them have sump pumps.

On the street?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm NJ too. I had the french drains put in years ago. They will solve the problem.
The price seems reasonable. In NJ most people had Vulcan calling them all the time. This was before telemarketing went completely out of control and I called them when I decided to have the work done. I can't remember what I paid but this was in the 70s.
When you see the amount of work it takes the price will seem more reasonable.
Some things to consider. They may want to hook up to the sanitary system. Don't let them, in most places that's illegal. Discuss that before hand.
If you might have radon issues, consider that. They will be opening the slab to air infiltration. It may agravate radon penetration and you might later have to have the system sealed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thanks.
How do I know if I have rodon issues? 5 years ago, during the inspection, the rodon level was normal...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

does your homes basement sit above the level of the street?
rephrased is there somewhere to drain the water too?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No, I think the basement floor is below the level of the street -- the water has to be pumped out...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Any houses in your area with Radon levels that needed remediation would be one clue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 15:35:03 -0400, Dan Espen

If you didn't have it in the first test, especially if was a 5-day test and not a 12 hour test, you probably don't have it now.
Except for the point he makes that if you cut a hole for the sump, maybe more will slip through.
They sell radon test kits at hardware stores, including Home Depot etc. The good ones (at least 20 years ago) had to stay in the basement for several days, then had to be sent away in the envelope provided where they would process the test. I don't remember how long this takes in practice. Probably less now.
I think what they do now often is put the radon removal fan vent in the sump. I saw that once.
But don't get too worried. Only what 10% of houses have radon, or more, or fewer. I don't remember but it's nowhere near a majority even. Still this would be a good time to run one more test if you are going to cut all the way through your floor.
Because a complete floor keeps the radon out, right? It only gets in through cracks if there are some, and sumps. Right?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I mean, to run one more test AFTER you cut the holes in the floor. Would definitely do that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

P&M
I'm not sure what kind of utility pump you are using, but instead of pumping in the evening, why don't you buy a sump pump and pump all day and all night long. The pump will turn off when the water level gets to an inch or two. I think you can buy a pedestal pump or a submersillble sump pump and both will work the same basically.
You don't need a sump to use a sump pump if there is water in the whole basement.
I'm sure you can use flexible hose, perhaps the same hose you are using now, and clamp it on to the output with a radiator hose clamp.
I'm not saying this will solve your problem, but you won't have to tend to the pump, and you won't feel like you are in such a rush with only an inch or two in the basement. You may be able to channel the water from the crawlspace to the six foot basement area, but you'lve probably already done that.
When you solve this problem, however you do it, you can take your sump pump and put it in (one of?) your sumps. So it won't cost you a thing.
I would turn it on and run it for a half hour without leaving the house the first time. And don't plug it in or unplug it when you are standing in water. I hope you are turning your current pump on and off safely, so whatever you are doing for that you can probably do for this one.

That won't be true if you pump 24 hours a day.
That's all I have for now.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

This is what I have now (or even a little better), but tomorrow is another rainy day according to the forcast :( My main concern is high humidity in the basement, and how it affects the wood (floor) above it.

No, I thought about this, but I would have to do it in the concrete... to my surprise the contractor doing the estimate didn't propose this... He proposed two separate french drain systems.

Correct, but for this I need enough water to collect in one place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.