Water heaters

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you need large supply lines for gas tankless, and do check your miinimum wanter water temperature, often incoming water can be very cold.
tankless rarely save much because of their high initial cost, service requirements, you need local service tech, and the warranty is never more than 10 years.
newer regular tanks are foam insulated with nearly no standby losses and very reliable requiring little or no service
if a gas tankless using electricity a power outage means no hot water at all.........
standard tanks have enough hot water for at least a couple showers..
if you desire endless hot water get a 50 or 75 gallon regular high BTU TANK. 75,000 BTU IS OVER TWICE a regulat 30K btu tank
regular tanks are pretty cheap tankless cost a fortune and manufacturers require pro install for valid warranty...
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Like most things, there are pros and cons. The biggest pro, IMO, is the fact that with a correctly sized gas tankless you have unlimited hot water. And you do save on energy by eliminating standby loss.
The negatives are, for any reasonable whole house use it has to be gas, as electric would require the entire typical service capacity. And even with gas, you may need to upgrade the supply lines to meet the demands, as opposed to just dropping in a replacement std unit. That combined with the cost of the unit means that it can take a long time to recover the higher upfront cost.
You just have to decide what is important to you, how long you expect to live there, etc.
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How's the operational cost any more expensive than a traditional electric water heater?
A: It's not.
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Thanks to all who replied. Opted to replace the failing heater with a similar unit. Looking at the tankless variety I could not see where the higher initial costs would be offset by efficiency's in any reasonable time.
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Maybe so; maybe no.
If someone is home most of the time and hot water is used duirng much of the time or you routinely shut down the water heater when you intend to be gone for a day then at present prices (including installation -- the demand water heaters require 2 to 4 times the peak power of "conventional" heaters) they are hard to justify.
The conventional heaters are just about dirt simple and use decades old technolocy. The demand heaters have electronics which might be damaged by power surges, etc.
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newer tanks have low standby loses, and heat lost too interior heated spaces really isnt lost in the winter, since it helps heat your home. although in the summer it can add to AC loads a little.
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