Water heater wire - conduit or romex?

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Which IS what the code allows - the furring strip supports the cable and makes it difficult for people to hang things from the whire - which is the intent.
I "believe" it needs to be a minimum 1X3, but I could be wrong.

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*Yeah 1" x 2" or 1" x 3" will be fine for one or two cables. No need to build something substantial. You just want something that won't spilt when you nail staples into it. Use whatever you have available.
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1x2 will work just fine.
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This question had been discussed in here several times before, but I'm not really sure of the result--is it ok to use romex inside pvc conduit? Of course the OP didn't specify the distance in the crawl space ---5' or 50'-- but if pvc w/ romex is permissable, it would seem to me to be the best,easiest and probably cheapest way to go. Last 3/4 pvc conduit I bought at Depot, a month or so ago, was $1.05 for 10'. 1/2" was 80 something cents, but 1/2" may be a little small to try and get #10 romex through. An 8' 1x2 would cost more than even the 3/4' conduit, and with conduit ,no need to "build' anything-- just strap the conduit every few feet and you are done. Just wondering-- Larry
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(Lp1331 1p1331) wrote:

Any place that it's legal to install romex, it's legal to install romex in PVC conduit.

PVC electrical conduit, that cheap?? Are you sure you weren't looking at PVC water pipe?

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Doug--regarding PVC conduit prices-- that's what I paid for 3/4"at a Home Depot here in San Antonio a little over a month ago. This is the grey conduit from the electrical department. I don't remember the brand, or if it had the one end swaged out so you didn't need a coupling or not. That's what I couldn't understand-- it was about half the cost of PVC water pipe. In fact, about six months ago, I needed some 1/2"PVC for a drain for a small mini split a/c that I may install in the future in a house I am working on. The walls and ceiling are open (the room that will/might have the a/c is upstairs) so I am installing the copper, wiring and drain now, regardless of whether I install the a/c or not. Anyway, I had a bunch of 1/2" regular PVC in my cart at HD, and happened to walk past the electrical dept and saw the 1/2" conduit for 80+ cents/10foot. The water pipe was at least 50% more, so I put it back and got the conduit. BTW, I got the 1/2" and the 3/4" at different HD's, so I guess that was the right price. Doesn't make sense to me either, but I'm not complaining. I already have a ton of the sweep 45 and 90 fittings for 1/2" up to around 2" that I picked up over the years when our local ReStore/Habitat for Humanity stores would get it in. They ranged from about 10-50 cents dependiing on size. Larry
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Lp1331 1p1331 wrote:

Pressure rating? Potability? Uniformity in size?
Would probably work great for a drain, though.
Jon
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 17:28:09 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

You got 2 dozen answers and nobody mentioned the required disconnect at a water heater. That is where you transition from the cable (RX or UF) to the flex and the discrete wires. As for a cable, how would you secure it? You can use a flex whip without supporting it. A cable needs to be secured within a foot of the termination and supported, following the building finish. I know we have all seen cables going to water heaters but it is a violation. So is the lack of a disconnect.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I am installing a disconnect near the breaker box (subpanel with a 30A breaker), and running the wire (UF at this point) along the side of a 2x2 under the floor joists (in the crawl space) in a 16 foot run to the water heater.
I had planned on just pulling the UF up through the floor (possibly through a flexible steel conduit at that point) and terminating the UF and steel conduit at the water heater.
Jon
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*The circuit breaker can be used as a disconnect if it is within sight of the water heater or if it is capable of being locked in the open position. Otherwise you can just put a two pole 30 amp toggle switch near the water heater.
If you use metal conduit to sleeve the cable it will need to be grounded. Better to sleeve it with PVC or just run metal conduit the whole length of the run and use individual conductors instead of cable which would be cheaper and easier than pulling cable in conduit.
Personally I would not use UF in this instance because it is not needed and not worth the extra money and hassle for the little benefit. If you want protection from moisture use PVC conduit and pull individual conductors. PVC is easy to work with, you can strap it to the underside of the beams, you can bend pieces by heating them in your oven, and the cost will be cheaper than cable. From the disconnect switch box at the heater location you can run a piece of flexible conduit either metal or plastic to the water heater. If it were my house I would run EMT or a combination of EMT and Greenfield, but I have benders and know how to work with that.
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On Sun, 15 Nov 2009 17:00:54 -0500, "John Grabowski"

That's good to know. gfr had me scared.

Even for individual connectors, if there are 90^ or even 45^ bends, or more than one, in the PVC, isn't it hard to pull them? Does a "leader" have to be put in before everything is glued together?
It sounds impossible to pull Romex through 90^ PVC bend.

EMT? Greenfield?
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*The code limits a total of 360 degrees worth of bends in a conduit run without condulets or junction boxes. However a good practice is to keep it to three 90's or less for ease of pulling. Pulling through four 90's can be hard work. No need to put a "Leader" in the conduit during assembly. Thats what vacuums and fishtapes are for. Pulling romex into conduit is definitely more work than individual conductors, but if the conduit is sized right and you have plenty of La Forcea Bruta the cable will go.

*Electrically Metallic Tubing and Flexible Metal Conduit.
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On Mon, 16 Nov 2009 14:24:18 -0500, "John Grabowski"

Wow. I thought I had heard what EMT was and just forgotten it, but I don't think I ever knew before.
Thansk for a great answer.
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On 11/17/2009 10:52 AM mm spake thus:

Ackshooly, I find "electricAL metallic tubing" to be a better description.
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On Sun, 15 Nov 2009 13:07:10 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

The disconnect has to be within site of the water heater.
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