Water Heater Thermostat settings ?

Page 1 of 3  

We just had a new Rheem 50 gal water heater installed. The water was way too high for our needs.
I turned the power off, and took off the plates to the thermostats. Both the upper and lower elements were set at 150 degrees, too hot for us. I set them both at 115 degrees.
But, here is my question... should both the upper and lower elements be set at the same temperature ? I noticed that on our old heater, the upper thermostat was not adjustable, which leads me to wonder if their is an "ideal" setting for the upper element, regardless of the temperature setting of the lower thermostat.
What say ye ??
James
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Below that Legionella thrive and you can catch legionaires disease in the shower. Use a tempering valve if you want to limit the temperature in your pipes (required by law in a lot of areas)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've never heard of anyone getting Legionnaire's Disease from a home water system or from showering....if it is growing in home water heaters with temps below 150, there should be a hell of a lot of people getting it.
With young children or elderly people, I would not keep the temp higher than about 115.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 18:13:36 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

That's not very good logic.

I'd keep it at 140F, but I tended to teach the kid basic safety. In fact when he was a kid our hot water came directly out of the furnace at closer to 180F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, I know someone that had it last year and yes, the water system was supposed to be the culprit. I did not see the results first hand though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 18:13:36 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

There have been reports in the news lately about a study done in Quebec, I believe - and the incidence is much higher than you may want to believe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I keep my water heater around 140 or 150 because I like hot water.
If the Legionnaire's Disease does come from the water heater, what about all the systems that have a storage tank for the well ? All the cold water should be full of the germs. My house has a well and no chemicals are added to the water system. I moved about 5 years ago from where a group of about 10 houses were hooked to a large well and outside storage tank with no chemicals added. Looks like that big storage tank would have been a big breeding ground. Especially in the summer .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You want to avoid the growth and activity range. * 20 to 50 C (68 to 122 F): Legionellae growth range * Below 20 C (68 F): Legionellae can survive but are dormant
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

So what do YOU do about all water consumed that does not go through the water heater? Piping hot lemonaid? Icemaker conected to hot water side? You take a 150 degree shower with no cold water? Brush teeth and rinse with 150 degree water?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

How much of that water sits there breeding bacteria? If the water is kept below (or above) the range where Legionella multiplies, it'll be safe. If it doesn't sit, it'll be safe. I suspect chlorine (city water) helps too, as does (colder) well water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Current recommendations say you shouldn't set your temperature below 120 degrees to keep legionaires bacteria from multiplying in your hot water tank.
That temperature keeps it from multiplying but doesnt kill it. 140 degrees will kill it.
* 70 to 80 C (158 to 176 F): Disinfection range * At 66 C (151 F): Legionellae die within 2 minutes * At 60 C (140 F): Legionellae die within 32 minutes * At 55 C (131 F): Legionellae die within 5 to 6 hours * Above 50 C (122 F): They can survive but do not multiply * 35 to 46 C (95 to 115 F): Ideal growth range * 20 to 50 C (68 to 122 F): Legionellae growth range * Below 20 C (68 F): Legionellae can survive but are dormant
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/03/turning-down-water-heater-safe.php
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Wholly crap! Learn something every other day. Never saw a warning on any heaters. Mine is set at 120 and I bet Vacation setting is even colder.
Snipped from that link:
The US Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) says
Q. Can Legionnaires' disease be prevented?
A. Yes. Avoiding water conditions that allow the organism to grow to high levels is the best means of prevention. Specific preventive steps include:
Maintain domestic water heaters at 60C (140F). The temperature of the water should be 50C (122F) or higher at the faucet.
Q. Do you recommend that I operate my home water heater at 60C (140F)?
A. Probably not if you have small children or infirm elderly persons who could be at serious risk of being scalded by the hot water. However, if you have people living with you who are at high risk of contracting the disease, then operating the water heater at a minimum temperature of 60C (140F) is probably a good idea. Consider installing a scald-prevention device.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
homer wrote:

Legionella also appears in large central air conditioning systems, evaporative coolers, whirlpool spas, architectural fountains, room-air humidifiers, ice making machines, misting equipment, and similar disseminators.
The bacteria are everywhere and cannot be easily remove from most water supplies (it takes hypoclorination or ozone). Infection is via respiration of airborne bacteria released when water droplets vaporize. The airborne bacteria can travel up to six miles.
My take on the infection vector is that a problem occurs when more bacteria enter the system than the body's immune system can accommodate.
Why waste money on the higher water heater settings if we're all gonna die anyway?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Exactly. Nobody gets out alive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dear Hey Bub:

None of which are sprayed at your face, such as when you are showering.

Almost. The number of viable organisms per second is probably closer to the facts.

Why die a horrible death from a preventable disease? Keep the setting above 140 degrees F, and add a tempering valve. It is the best advice given. That way a disease-laden fog is not sprayed directly into the face.
David A. Smith
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
homer wrote:

What a bunch of crap. Legionellae grow in stagnet water not pressureized water tanks and can't get in there anyway. What about your cold water system on a well system? Full of legionellae? Bull crap. Never happens.
--
LSMFT

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's your funeral.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:47:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

<scissor>
It seems to me that Canada is really worried about all this danger. I cannot find where America is overly concerned - just an observation.
I've kissed fish before release and haven't caught any odd disease.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was told 145 was the minimum "safe" temperature with 150 recommended.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.