water heater: removing anode rod

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No hot shower is a biggie for us, less important for tub bathers.
So you have gone 3 days without hot water, spent 20 bucks on a anode rod, how much will the vinegar cost, you will need a LOT to really clean the tank since the rust MIGHT b formed in the bottom but then again MAY be near the top:(
Letus know how it goes your family must be patient:) I KNOW mine never is:(
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Some time ago Consumer Reports cut open water heater to check the insides.
As I recall, the 9 or 12 year warranty heaters contained much better insulation that the 6 year warranty.
If you decide to replace it...
No hot shower is a biggie for us, less important for tub bathers.
So you have gone 3 days without hot water, spent 20 bucks on a anode rod, how much will the vinegar cost, you will need a LOT to really clean the tank since the rust MIGHT b formed in the bottom but then again MAY be near the top:(
Letus know how it goes your family must be patient:) I KNOW mine never is:(
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With hot water heaters your much better off buyimng a longer warranty heater with higher BTU output so you dont run out of hot water!
The price difference between a 34,000 BTU 40 gallon 6 year warranty tank and a 50 gallon 75,000 BTU is TWICE the amount of available hot water, better insulation, better drain valve, likely brass, longer warranty and not a big price difference!
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wrote:

Glad you got it open, Mine looks the same with the "sludge" scary to think you drink/shower in that. but oh well. I put hydrogen peroxide in mine every month or 2 to kill a sulfur smell that grows from bacteria in my well.
Dave
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Technically you shouldnt drink hot water, for health reasons, nice cozy warm tank excellent place to grow bacteria
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Except, the temperature is generally too high for bacteria to reproduce rapidly (your body gives you a fever of 105*F to fight infection), the water is under pressure, and is usually full of chlorine or chloramine.
I don't doubt that there are a few hardy strains of bacteria that could thrive in such conditions (some particularly nasty microorganisms can live in natural hot springs, for example), but it seems pretty unlikely that they could survive the trip through public water processing plants.
If you have a well, then all bets are off.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Look up info on the legionella pneumophila bacterium -- the bug that causes Legionnaire's disease. I keep my water heater at >= 140 deg. F to discourage growth. The bacterium can colonize dead legs of the water system and pose probs especially in "aerosols" such as showers. It's not just folks with wells who should be concerned.
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Just for completeness:
As noted, after much effort, I did get the rod out. Next time, I'll get an impact wrench. I put a new (aluminum) rod in. I flushed the tank several times, including 2x with vinegar. One thing I found is that it flushes much more 'powerfully' if I remove the draincock.
... And, it's running, no leaks so far. We'll see how it goes.
Thanks to all who replied.
George
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No need for an impact wrench if you wrapped the threads with Teflon tape. It still provides protection, can check continuity with a meter if you like.
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I will be looking for rust reports....
how much vinegar did you add to tank?
does the water smell of vinegar?
inquiring minds want to know?
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wrote:

2 flushes, 1 gal ea

No. I flushed with water after.
G
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Did you pour a gallon of vinegar in the heater input line? Was there heater full of water at the time? or empty?
Has the rust gone away?
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wrote:

Oh, yeah. Tank was empty. I poured a gal of white vinegar into the anode rod hole (I hadn't put the new rod in), and let it sit overnight. No water added. That's what the vendor's web site said to do.
When I let that drain, it came a little dirty ('rusty'), so I flushed with water - as in, run about 5 gal of water into the tank, then take the draincock off and let it gush out into a bucket. This brought out 'some' (like, a cup or two) of white lumpy stuff. I'm guessing that the vinegar is supposed to dissolve that.
So, I stuck a wooden dowel down the anode rod hole, and kind of stirred up the bottom. It felt like it might be plowing through some sort of sediment. I flushed that with water a few more times, and got out more lumpy white stuff. The water was a little cloudy, but not 'rusty'.
Then, I did another vinegar flush, as above. After I flushed that with water, it ran clean.

Yes - to my eye, the water is running clean. And, when I let it sit, nothing settles out of it.
G
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Yeah, I did that. The impact wrench is for the next water heater, whenever that might be.
G
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