Water heater pressure relief value drip

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I don't care if he was 7 or 75, piping a leaking relief valve to a floor drain is criminal.
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I have to agree if he doesn't fix the valve first. As to running it to a drain. That is only good practice as long as you leave an air gap.
Harry K
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Wow! He agrees with what I say!
Amazing.
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Maybe not, but it'll stop closing properly... So (2) is a bad idea
3) a springloaded shock absorber will also work (the expansion is actually _very_ little), and use up less room.
4) An upwards facing capped off chunk of pipe will work for a few months, but you have to reconstruct the airpocket every so often.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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maybe just turn the temp down a bit.
as a side note, next time consider a tankless or 'on demand' water heater. many benefits to be had.
randy
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On Thu, 6 May 2004 11:26:23 -0400, "Remove dots from userid to reply"

I had this problem a few years back. I replaced the valve on the hotwater heater, which stopped the dripping for a few days. I then replaced the PVR - the one that is between the street and me - and have had no leaks since. I put an expansion tank in to meet code, that was a 10 minute job at the most.
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Your plumbing should be about 50psi. The T&P valve will drip at about 150psi. Can you see why letting it drip is a bad idea?
Someone recommended either a shock absorber or a capped pipe. The smallest expansion tank is probably 50 times the size of a shock absorber. Can you see why a shock absorber probably won't work?
You might want to check your water pressure. Mine is 50psi normally, and goes up to 80psi maximum when the water heater does it worst. If yours is enough to trip the T&P, then it might be too high to start with.
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FWIW, when I bought my house, it didn't have a pressure reducing valve, therefore the pressure was about 120 psi. One of the first things I did was to install a PRV. The wife complained because the 50-55 psi I had it set to wasn't high enough, I reset it to 80 psi and she's happy.
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Mine was 85psi and the local code wisely allows a maximum of 70; so last year I installed a PRV, cutting it to 50.(except for my main outdoor outlet, that I replumbed to come before the valve) Can't really tell the difference except that a pinhole leak just before the water heater, that I couldn't rouse myself to fix, stopped leaking!
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No ;-)
Water is incompressible. That means that _very_ small thermal expansion leads to very high pressures in a rigid plumbing system. A few cubic inches worth of expansion room is usually going to be more than adequate to handle the fractions of a percentage of expansion from the "HWT downstream of checkvalve" problem.
But if you have the room, an expansion tank would be better. Usually overkill, but "better".

You really should regulate that out too. Mine doesn't vary more than a PSI or two. Important if you're on a well (eg: with poly well lines).
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