water heater leaking!

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"Wally W." wrote:

Yea, but it doesn't say if they did it themselves, or had a "professional" do it.
But there's a bigger issue with that story.
Water heaters are supposed to have safety valves.
Even if there were shut-off valves on both the inlet and outlet - and they were both shut off,
Even if the thermostat fails and calls for continuous heat,
The over-pressure valve is supposed to kick in and prevent a pressure buildup (and tank explosion).
Also note that it doesn't say if the tank is electric or natural gas.
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 10:38:17 PM UTC-4, HomeGuy wro te:

I wouldn't take that short story to mean that the tank itself necessarily blew up. More likely it was gas and that caused the explosion and fire.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Correction:

So even the contractor "cheepy" outlasted the 9-year warranty that your premium tank offers.

When we're talking about warranty and water heater, we're largely talking about the fact that it's a pressure vessel and it can fail by leaking. Other small differences (brass or plastic drain, anodes, turbulators) really don't factor into differences in cost when looking at 6 yr vs 9 yr warranties.
My heater is a GE "Smart Water" model GG40S06CVG, 36000 btu, plastic drain, brass hi-pressure vent/valve. I think it has a turbulator. There isin't much on the web about that model. I'm sure it's 6 years old by now.

The diff between 9 yr and 6 yr is inconsequential to me, and so is the 4K difference in BTU, so as far as I'm concerned you paid $92 extra for a brass drain valve and an extra anode (maybe - have no clue how many I have).
Would I pay $92 for a brass drain valve and an extra annode? Probably not.
Would I pay an extra $1000 for dual exhaust, power windows, FM radio with 8-track and air conditioning in the Impala vs Chevelle? Maybe.

For a stationary object that lives it's life without interaction (or even visibility) with people and can typically provide service for 10 to 20 years, I dare you to explain how anyone outside of the manufacturing and service industry can possibly have any idea how to appraise the VALUE of something like a water heater when browsing the various models in a retail setting like Home Despot, expecially when elements of it's construction that have a direct impact on service life (the pressure vessel itself) is not visible without significant disassembly or deconstruction of the item.

And it's been well established that these "cheap" heaters can routinely outlast their minimal 6-year warranty by a factor of 2 or more.
Your $92 is largely to finance the extra 3 years of waranty coverage - a winning proposition by the manufacturer because I'm sure the statistics would show that if a unit has lasted 6 years in the field without failing then the odds of it continuing for an additional 3 years is extremely high.
Tony Hwang wrote:

After years of consumer experience, you should have learned by now that selling extra warranty coverage is highly profitable for the manufacturer or retailer no matter what product we're talking about (cars, electronics, water heaters, etc).
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<stuff snipped>

Me too. And after building at least 30 PC's I've gotten pretty good at fixing them and see the value of experience when someone comes to me with a PC they're tried to fix themselves. But I don't have that same comfort level with plumbing and gladly will pay someone who does have a lot of experience to do something like replacing a water heater. Yes, I could probably do it myself if my life depended on it or if I didn't have the money to pay a plumber. But that's not my situation.

You've described why I often buy two of something I consider a critical unit like the DVR that's at the heart of my TV setup. When it failed, I swapped the backup unit in in less than 5 minutes. If I had to buy a new one, it would have involved rewiring, reprogramming all the remotes around the house that control it via an IR repeater network, etc. It's something I learned from keeping critical servers on line. You can't have enough identical spares if you want to minimize downtime and all the futzing that comes from shoehorning in an "almost identical" replacement.

It sounds like by watching him work, you know you've gotten your money's worth. Hell, at my age schlepping a 40G water heater around isn't really a good idea. Might end up costing way more than $1,000 in medical bills and lost time. (-:

Yep. Hot water is a mission-critical function. Despite the noise from our favorite resident troll, I think it's clear you made the right call.
--
Bobby G.



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Robert Green wrote:

Like I said earlier, an empty water heater is remarkably light. Me and the wife carried ours from our pickup into the house and down into the basement. Did the reverse for the old tank.

Enjoy your Obama-Care, with the $4000 deductible.

Makes me wonder why some people read and post to this newsgroup.
Why aren't you instead reading rec.cooking or rec.sewing or rec.dollhouses?
When you get your propane barbeque tanks refilled and bring them back home, do you call a certified pipefitter to connect it back to your barbeque?

No, the coffee maker is a mission-critical function. Flushing the toilet is a mission critical function. There are lots of things higher on the totem pole in a home than having hot water.

There's no substitute for being a man and having confidence I guess.
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On Thu, 22 May 2014 09:22:41 -0400, HomeGuy

I don't buy a warranty - I buy a water heater. And any GOOD product will outlast it's warranty. And any heater with 2 anodes will cost more than one with 1 or none - a brass valve will cost more than plastic

Will it still be working and not leaking 18 years from now??? Mine very likely will, and it's already 3 years old. Like I said before - I don't buy a warranty - I buy a quality water heater. The quality water heater just happens to also have a longer warranty.

And I didn't buy an "extra warranty"
You are free to buy the cheapest junk you can find. I prefer to buy quality.
"The bad taste of low quality lasts long after the sweet taste of low price has faded from the palate."
"It is almost always more expensive to pay too little for something than to pay too much"
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HomeGuy wrote:

I fail to understand your hostility and demeaning attitude toward those who don't have the same skills as you do. Some people can do certain things and some people can do other things. You will someday realize how powerless you are and find yourself in need of assistance from others. This is a good time to learn how to be humble so there will be people willing to help you.
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Oren wrote:

$897. That included same day diagnosis, next day service, expertise, and prior earned trust.
I live in SE VA. Hampton Roads area.
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On Fri, 23 May 2014 01:43:59 +0000 (UTC), "badgolferman"

And if I happen to be very busy with jobs that I do better than plumbing, I can pay a plumber to do the job and still come out ahead.
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Where in the referenced article does it say:
1) that the homeowner did the replacement, or 2) that the insurance company didn't cover the loss?
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when people do really stupid stuff homeowners companies typically still pay but the new policy excludes the stupid move.
like a fellow who in attempting to cut down a tree brought down a 15,000 volt line, which dropped across a 120 volt line and took out over $15,000 dollars worth of tvs, vcrs and other electronic appliances....
homeowners paid the entire claim but added a complete exclusion for all tree trimming or tree work in the future.
the fellows wife figured everyone along that line was collecting broke appliances to get them replaced.
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wrote:

A seismic valve would be a lot safer -but no help at all if the lines outside fracture.
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On 5/26/2014 2:05 PM, PaxPerPoten wrote:

It is interesting reading the Internet. "They are not that heavy." "And easy as pie to put in." "DIY for $300." Is that the ten gallon size? "My water heater is leaking, what do I do?"
Changing a water heater is a big deal. A 40 gallon heater with soaked insulation is a moose even drained. Old pipes that were sweated on instead of using nuts can be a bitch, and more than one house has burned down with some nimrod sweating new ones on or off. Where can I get a $300 40 gal water heater? My last one was $600, a propane model. And I paid the pro from the gas company $350 to install it. Beautiful work. Hoses with nuts on them. Earthquake straps. He even cut a 24" square piece of cabinet grade plywood for it to sit on "because he didn't like the looks of the floor under it as being weak." He stained and varnished the wood.
Changing a water heater ain't rocket surgery, but there is quite a bit to it, many things that can go wrong, and they can blow from the first floor foundation through the roof on the second story. They did it on Mythbusters. Anything that can kill you deserves respect.
Steve
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You'll need to provide citations. It doesn't happen in California, I can't speak for NY.
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On Tuesday, May 27, 2014 11:31:17 AM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I was thinking of posting that reply the other day too. It's been claimed here many times that insurance companies deny claims all the time because a permit wasn't pulled, the homeowner did something wrong, etc. But I have yet to see one case cited. Not saying it never happens. There probably are some extreme examples where they have done it, but I don't believe it's the general case.
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On 5/27/2014 10:31 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

And you sure cannot speak for California either!California will make you tear out anything that is not built on a permit before it can be sold. Also they will pull your occupancy permit, leaving you a vacant building.

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On Thursday, May 29, 2014 3:52:43 PM UTC-4, PaxPerPoten wrote:

Somehow I think that's an exaggeration too. Generally that which is built compliant with code and can be inspected, they just make you go through the permitting/inspecting process and maybe pay some penalty. For example, if a permit is required for a fence, but the fence is otherwise compliant, I seriously doubt AHJs in CA are going to make you tear it out and put in an identical one, which would be a huge waste and certainly dumb.
And if it what was done has some parts that can be corrected and then have it pass, then you get a permit, make the corrections. You generally don't tear it out. If however you've done something that is totally non-compliant, can't be corrected, can't be inspected, etc, then I can see them making you tear it out.
I also find it hard to believe that CA has some process whereby they try to find everything that might not have been done with a permit, just because the place is being sold. Sure, if there is something obvious, I can see them finding that as part of the CO process, but in a day when the cops don't even have time to catch a lot of criminals, I find it hard to believe some inspector is going to show up and try to match what's in a house to permits going back 50 years.
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On Thursday, May 29, 2014 7:30:41 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

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an identical one, which would be a huge waste and certainly dumb.

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The tv show flip or flop with tarek and that gorgeous christina:) have epis odes where they buy property at auction. when a unpermitted space turns up they must remove the drywall from at least one side, inspect it, bring it u p to code, get it inspected by the building inspector then replace the drwa ll. some unpermitted stuff thats real junk gets demolished but thats the ex ception not the rule.
I highly recommend the show, christiana is easy on the eyes, they make big bucks, and the show is educational....
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It can't be that difficult for folks to read their own policy, can it?
If the insurance company can prove fraud (i.e. the homeowner intentionally burned his domicile to claim a loss), the insurance company will file a civil suit (which will follow the criminal arson charges :-) to avoid payment (justifiably, too).
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On Tuesday, May 27, 2014 12:53:17 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I don't see why the insurance company would file a civil suit. They can just deny the claim and if the policy holder doesn't like it, then the policy holder can sue the insurance company to try to force them to pay.
But the claim being made here is that they won't pay not for fraud, but because the homeowner did some repair incorrectly, without a permit, etc. Yet they clearly pay for all the other dumb things a homeowner does, like smoking in bed and starting a fire. So, if it's so common it would be nice to see some examples, which should be easy to find.
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