water heater leaking!

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

http://www.homedepot.ca/product/hotpoint-40-gallon-natural-gas-water-heater-6-yr-warranty-36000-btu/903008
Hotpoint 40 Gallon Natural Gas Water Heater - 6 YR Warranty-36,000 BTU $373.00 (with tax, about $421 with tax)
http://www.homedepot.ca/product/ge40-gallon-natural-gas-water-heater-6-yr-warranty-36000-btu/903005
General Electric GE40 Gallon Natural Gas Water Heater 6 YR Warranty-36,000 BTU $402.00 (about $454 with tax)

Which means you paid $530 + tax.
You overpaid. The extra 3 years on the warranty wasn't worth the extra $150 - $175 up-front that you paid.
They all come out of the same factory.
After 6 years you'd be lucky if they gave you $265 credit on a replacement.
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HomeGuy wrote:

Hmm, My Sears 40 gal. 9 year one is going into 13th year now.
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On Tue, 20 May 2014 20:38:30 -0400, H wrote:

That's what insurance companies like to hear after a house burns down.
They just walk away ... with their check book as full as when they arrived ... while the code official writes a citation for installing the unit without a permit.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

BZZZ. Wrong.
The gas inlet is threaded pipe. The water inlet and outlets are also threaded connections. Nobody makes gas water heaters with that don't have threaded connections.

You show me a water tank that has short lengths of raw copper pipes sticking out of the top. You won't, because you can't.
Same goes for the gas inlet. NO TORCH OR WELDING REQUIRED to hook up the gas line, like BGM (the OP) claims.

Even if I did have to rework the iron gas line, it would be a simple matter of screwing a few short lengths together, a 90-degree elbow or two. But I don't see why you would have to - unless you wanted to relocate the new water tank. It should have lined up with existing pipes as-is.
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around here lots of people are using the flexible brite yellow gas lines originally designed for gas dryers and gas stoves...
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trader_4 wrote:

-1
Show me a natural gas hot water tank made in the last decade or two that doesn't have threaded connections for water and gas supply.
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 8:33:07 AM UTC-4, HomeGuy wrot e:

Just because the tank has a threaded connection doesn't say anything about what it's connected to. Very typically it's connected to a copper male adaptor which is then soldered to the home plumbing system Claire told you similar. But then being you, I know it's hard.
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trader_4 wrote:

After shoehorning a new water heater into place, I recall a sense of amazement that the damn thing lined up exactly with the existing plumbing. U figured it was going to be another adventure in modern plumbing.
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 9:54:59 AM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

Like Claire, I didn't assume anything. No one knows how the old WH is connected. No one knows for example if there is an old shutoff valve that should be replaced and that is soldered in. The old tank could be soldered in, no unions. And for the benefit of Homelessguy, no I don't mean the tank itself is soldered in. You typically have a threaded copper adaptor there and then it could be solder joints from there on.
OP said he doesn't have a torch, never soldered, etc. This is a fairly simple job, if you have the right skills and everything lines up, like it may. But if the OP doesn't have the skills, isn't comfortable screwing around with gas connections, etc, then he shouldn't be made to feel bad for using a pro.
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On 5/21/2014 3:00 PM, trader_4 wrote:

True, especially soldering. Once you know how, it is really easy. If you've never held a torch it is very intimidating. Sharkbite fittings though, make it possible for many people to do plumbing they never could before.
OTOH, there are many people that should never attempt to change out a water heater. Chances are, they have other skills that I'll never have, such as singing and dancing. .
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bob haller wrote:

Yea - that's something I didn't think of.
Your water heater doesn't move around, shake or vibrate like a clothes dryer does. The use of a short flexible link to connect a gas water heater is a much safer application of those flex lines than any other gas-using consumer device.
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<stuff snipped>

(-: That's pretty outrageous for a flippin' water heater. I have to decide now whether to buy one now on sale and store it or just bite the bullet and pull the old one out *before* it starts leaking. It's about as old as yours, but it sees fairly light use. Nine hundred dollars. You'd think it was a self-powered polonium core unit with gold filigree.
--
Bobby G.



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trader_4 wrote:

What - do you expect every joint and elbow in the water distribution lines in house is going to have threaded connections?!
What kind of bone-head are you?
The point of this discussion is that you people are claiming that it's hard, oh so hard to connect a new hot water tank yourself because you have to break out the torch and welder, because nobody uses threaded connections, yet you completely miss the point that the most crucial location (and really, the ONLY place you need or want to have threaded connections) is on the friggin device or appliance itself. Why you would want threaded connections or unions anywhere else makes absolutely no sense.
And if you want a threaded joint somewhere in a water pipe where it currently doesn't exist, you cut the friggen copper pipe and solder one on. If you can't do that, then what the hell are you doing reading and posting to this news group? You should be reading rec.crafts.sewing or baking or similar.
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 10:17:05 AM UTC-4, HomeGuy wro te:

No, but apparently you do.

You're lying. I never said any such thing.

It makes perfect sense. The WH I have and the other ones that are typically installed here, are like Claire told you. There is a male copper adaptor that is screwed into the tank. Or many of them come with dielectric nipples, so you use a female adaptor. From there copper pipe with solder joints connects it to the system. That is a very typical install. Capiche?
http://www.checkthishouse.com/wp-content/uploads/loose-oversized-water-heat er-vent-pipe.jpg
http://aaawicks.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/1-power-vent-tank-water-heat ers.jpg
http://designhome.pics/how-to-drain-a-water-heater/42/drain-your-hot-water- heater%E2%80%A6/
Got it now?
Alternatively you could have unions that allow only threaded connections to be used. But you can't just have a threaded connection on the tank, because without a coupling, you can't connect it.
Explain to us how you could just have one threaded connection to the water heater and no unions, threaded connections, anywhere adjacent. Even you seem to recognize that because you said:
"Then you unscrew the couplers and move the old tank out of the way. "
Well, if there is no coupler on the old system, ie it's soldered in, then you can't unscrew it, idiot.

No shit Sherlock. But the OP said he doesn't have a torch, doesn't know how to solder, doesn't want to work with gas, etc. Is that so hard to comprehend? You claimed no soldering was involved just screwed connections. Make up your mind.

A lot of people come here looking for advice on how to proceed with a repair project that may include using a pro. They don't need your insults, especially when you don't know WTF you're talking about.
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A common internet meme ...

... that has never happened in real life.
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 11:11:04 AM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Hold on, there is some truth to it.
While there is no known case of an insurance company latching on to a DIY repair to avoid paying a valid claim,
there are MANY cases of a DIY'er accidentally burning the house down while tackling a repair beyond his level of skill.
Just saying.
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On 5/21/2014 10:11 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Actually it is a common occurrence in state like New York and California. If you insist on doing your own work...Go get a permit and have it inspected to cover your ass and to keep your family healthy. Use a little common sense for crists sake!

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On Tue, 20 May 2014 21:32:16 +0000 (UTC), "badgolferman"

You did right. No hassle for you. It's within the range of a typical plumber install. And you trust them. Sometimes it's best to have somebody else do it.
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On 5/21/2014 7:01 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Just for the hell of it, http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/whh/pages/water-heater-museum-home.html
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use the flexible gas line if needed
use sharkbites with PEX or copper.....
No sweating of pipes necessary
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