Water heater is ALWAYS filling....what could be the problem?

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Hi Joseph, hope you are having a nice day
On 07-Mar-05 At About 07:07:37, Joseph Meehan wrote to All Subject: Re: Water heater is ALWAYS filling....what could be the problem?
JM> Sorry you feel that way. But I have seen more than one PT that JM> someone piped in such a way that you could not see the end. It JM> happens even if you have never seen it. I know well that it is not JM> code and not safe, but, as I am sure you know, not everyone knows JM> or bothers to follow code.
As I said I haven't seen one yet but I am sure there are.
JM> I feel sorry that you seem to have a personal problem with me. I JM> don't know why. Sorry you are having a bad day.
Stop answering questions you know nothing about and the "problems" will stop. the problem isn't mine it is yours. you seem to have a problem with letting someone knowledgeable answer questions. you do get some right but why not let someone who really knows the answer give it?
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
.. That's the problem with the gene pool: No lifeguard.
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Hi Doug, hope you are having a nice day
On 07-Mar-05 At About 07:53:06, Doug Miller wrote to All Subject: Re: Water heater is ALWAYS filling....what could be the problem?
DM> From: snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller)
DM> > Nope, I do service only with a little install work. I am DM> exclusively in the >commercial side now. I don't think you can DM> honestly say what I have seen in >my 30+ years in the trade but as DM> for a T&P I have never seen one terminated >improperly.
DM> The fact that you're working in commercial installations probably has DM> a lot to do with that. A commercial business will normally insist DM> on having things done right, and will hire a licensed plumber DM> who knows how to do that. Dick and Jane Homeowner, on the other DM> hand, may have it done by a neighbor, Jane's cousin's ex-husband, DM> or some jackleg they hired from a handyman ad in the newspaper. DM> Or Dick may get his buddy from work to do the job for a case of beer DM> (consumed while working). Or do it himself. You get the picture.
DM> I'm *not* in the trade, just a homeowner with better than average DM> handyman skills, but I've seen quite a few that were terminated DM> improperly. In fact, based on the homes I've purchased, made offers DM> on, or looked at with a realtor, I'd say that more residential DM> T&P valves are terminated IMproperly than properly.
I am sure that there problably are non code P&T terminations But as I said I haven't seen one yet and as for commercial work I have always done commercial work along with 20 or so years of residential.
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
.. "After they make styrofoam, what do they ship it in?" - s.w.
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I would look at bypassing the line in the slab if it is at all possible. It would most likely be MUCH cheaper, and in my opinion better also. I do not like the idea of having any joints in copper piping inside a slab. Larry
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Steve wrote:

To which I say:
"One expert look is worth a thousand expert opinions."
Sorry it turned out to be very close to my initial "Worst Case" answer, but we had fun kicking this around didn't we guys?
Jeff (Whirling around doing his "I toldjaso" dance...)
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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Yeah - the thought was that IF the leak were detected in the slab at another point - say mid living room or kitchen, then I was going to totally by-pass it by running it up & through the attic then back down to the dishwasher/sink in the kitchen.
That would leave a very short run of ~15-20 feet running under the garage portion of the slab.
As it is, I will just fix this part now & then when we finally get around to doing the complete kitchen remodel (wife wants it soon - I'm going to wait until I can pay cash for it) then we will discuss better options to include bypassing the hot water run altogether and putting in a point of service heater just to serve the kitchen.
--Steve
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house
another
by-pass
to
include
We had a similar hot water leak under the slab a few years ago. Fortunately it was in the run from the heater to the kitchen sink and all on the same side of the hallway. A very competent plumber removed the baseboard and ran a bypass along the base of the wall and I made a new baseboard from two strips of millwork. After patching some drywall and painting, you'd never know it happened.
That rerouting through the attic has a potential downside unless you're in a really freeze free area. Here, near Las Vegas, some neighbors went on a winter vacation. A rare freezing spell broke an attic pipe and they had a real mess when they came home. --- SJF
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Running pipe in slad is never the best idea, for HW the slab cools the pipe rapidly. Run new pipe at wall or ceiling, now you have a chance to insulate the pipe well.
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[...]
Is there *no* way to bypass as folks are suggesting? That would save scads of time, work, and materials if you do not have to bust/repour the slab.
If you must go the slab route, you might want to see about some sort of continuous/non corrodible line so there are no joints in the slab. Is there a PEX product that is OK for potable water and slab burial? (I don't know if the pex they use for radiant floor heating is ok for drinking/cooking water.)
What about using a concrete saw to cut a shallow trough for the line? Might be less work/material.
If nothing else, insulate the line so you don't get the thermal transfer.
good luck
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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lp13-30 wrote:

I second this as well. For some reason the brilliant builders of my house decided to run the water pipes through the garage slab. It goes about 1 foot over into the crawlspace and could have easily been avoided. Makes NO sense.
A big downside of slab embedded hot water pipes is the energy loss from the slab absorbing the heat.
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Hi but, hope you are having a nice day
On 13-Mar-05 At About 16:17:37, but not that Bob wrote to All Subject: Re: Water heater is ALWAYS filling....what could be the problem?
bntB> HvacTech2 wrote:
bntB> If you'd consider reading what the OP said instead of critiquing bntB> other responders, you'd surely know that this install isn't bntB> terminated "properly" so the TP runoff can be easily observed:
And if you would have read his final reply you would have seen I was right the whole time. it wasn't the T&P it was a leak under the slab.
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
.. "What I wouldn't give to be a latchkey kid..." -- Calvin
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Is there a possibility that there is a hot water recirculation system here? If he had a leak oin the hot water lines, the water heater would probably fire almost continuously. Maybe a restriction in a recirc system could make a noise like that. If it is a leak, most water meters have a little red or white triangle in the middlr of the dial called a leak detector. It will rotate visibly even with low flow rates. Turn all faucets in the house off and watch the meter to see if there is a leak.
Stretch
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HvacTech2 wrote:

If you'd consider reading what the OP said instead of critiquing other responders, you'd surely know that this install isn't terminated "properly" so the TP runoff can be easily observed:
"T&P valve - yes, that is what I meant - it does seem to be functionaing properly - though I can't verify that completely - when I open it, I do get hot water running throught he pipes to the outside of the garage."
Why do HVAC guys on Usenet think they're all rocket scientists?
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