water heater installation questions

I am replacing a 6+ year old Rheem 50 gallon gas water heater with another 50 gallon gas that is almost identical. I have some questions about the installation:
1) the old water heater had small metal "legs" that raised it 2-3" off the floor, which is actually a brick pedestal in my garage. The new one has no legs and appears to be designed so that the flat bottom just sits directly on the floor. Do the newer ones not have feet?
2) The cold water inlet is supplied through a brass shutoff valve, with a piece of copper flex sweated into the outlet of the shutoff valve, and the other end of the flex goes to the fitting that screws on the cold water nipple on the old heater. The fitting is *VERY* corroded, so I plan to replace that entire piece of copper flex. I assume I should able to just heat up the outlet side of the brass valve, removed the old copper, and then sweat in a new piece of flex. Is there any precautions I should take to protect the brass valve from heat during the sweating/soldering process?
Thanks, Tim C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim C. wrote:

6 years old and your are replacing it? Your water must really be corrosive.
I am just a home owner but here goes: 1. Seldom ever see a water heater with legs, and have never seen a new one. Some make a little stand that the heater sits on. Most just sit directly on the floor. It were me, I would put down a piece of linoleum or other non water absorbent material as a cushion for the heater to sit on. If nothing else, use a couple of pieces of 6 mil plastic
2. Again. if it were me, I would sweat a copper male screw fitting into the outlet, that way you wouldn't have to do any soldering the next time. You need to put in new flex line for both the cold inlet and the hot outlet. Don't know what kind of brass valve you have, but I would turn the water off upstream of that brass valve, open the valve, and then solder. Might clamp a vise wrench on the valve just upstream of your solder joint as a heat sink. You get around all these kinds of problems by soldering screw fittings to the pipe and using screwed on valves and and pipe connectors. Plumbers don't do that because it is more expensive and they don't care about change overs cause they get paid. Besides, if it is all soldered together, there is less chance that the homeowners will do it themselves.
If you are really worried about the valve, say the heck with it, remove the valve, solder a screw fitting in the pipe and by a valve that screws in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George,
I got the water heater successfully installed today. We are up and running with hot water !!
I put the water heater on some of the flexible rubber matting that is installed in the bottom of showers before tile is put down, whatever that is called.
After I cleaned the fitting with a wire brush, turned out it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it was - mostly surface corrosion that I cleaned off. It is good enough to continue to use, so I did.
Thanks for the advice.
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.