Water Heater dripping like noise

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Bob mentioned turning off the water main and see if the noise stops. I should have tried this sooner...
I've only had the house several months so don't know much history. Dripping noise started 2 weeks ago.
Will look closer at stains, and get back
thanks marc
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I just found this water on the other side of the wall, outside. [the vent is into the garage, near the w.heater]
The water is NOT coming from the pipe, which is probably, somehow part of the w.heater.
http://imgur.com/QddAhUe
http://i.imgur.com/QddAhUe.jpg
http://imgur.com/WLSmTsF
http://i.imgur.com/WLSmTsF.jpg
what should I do?! where do I start? do I need a professional now?
thanks marc
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On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 5:59:57 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What makes you so sure that the water isn't coming from the pipe? It sure looks like it from the pic. First thing to figure out is where that pipe goes and what it does. The most likely candidate is that it;s from the TPR valve on the WH. So.....I took a look back at the pics you posted of the WH. And you can't see a TPR. It sure looks like the idiots put it in with the TPR facing into the corner, where you may not even be able to get at it. There is a copper pipe that comes out from the right of the WH, and that must be connected to the TPR valve. Is that copper pipe connected to the PVC that emerges from the outside? It must go somewhere that it could release water if the WH pressure or temp gets too high. Typically they just end above a basement floor or get routed outside. Where is that outside pipe in relation to the WH when we're looking at in inside the garage?
If it's not from the WH, then any chance that PVC is a central AC condensate drain line??
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On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 7:11:49 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

I don't think there's enough water to be a condensate line.
Most likely you called it right as a TPR drip. Really bad installation to hide the TPR and have no shutoff valves anywhere.
But there's another possibility. He says the washer and dryer are just on the other side of that wall, the one to the right seems likely. Washer hoses go bad often, he should check that too.
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thanks,
the wall is very wet, and no water is on the pipe end [not to mention, the drip drip drip going on]
I think I have to break open the outer wall and locate this drip, very soon
marc
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On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 1:36:38 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It could still be the TPR, which might not be connected to that pipe at all. As trader says, it would be unusual to transition copper to PVC, though not impossible.
Or the TPR might be connected to that pipe, and then something else must be leaking.
That's an exterior wall, are you in a climate where something could freeze and burst? Did you check wash machine hoses and drain?
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On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 4:16:28 PM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

Also you can get an endoscope for $20 or so and just drill a hole. I've not tried that myself but it might be easier than breaking a wall.
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On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 1:19:49 PM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

What makes you say that? In the pic, there is a decent size puddle and you can only see the part that's in the pic, no idea where it ends or runs off to. Also, no idea how much the AC is running or not running.

The only part there that doesn't make sense is the pipe outside is PVC and the pipe at the WH is copper. Then could have transitioned it, but usually you wouldn't.

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If it were me, I'd open the interior wall before I'd open the outer wall. It's much easier to repair and match an interior wall than an exterior wall, especially one with a textured finish. Even if I had to move a washer, dryer, even the water heater, I'd still start inside.
Besides, once you find the leak, an interior wall repair can wait. A hole in the exterior, not so much.
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On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 7:34:45 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

+1 x 10
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That's quite a butchered plumbing job. I wonder what else is hidden behind that wall.
Since you will probably want to enlarge and square off that hole in order to insert a neat patch, it might make sense to enlarge it enough to see (and replace) the connection for the other WH pipe. I doubt they did a better job on that one. It's better to fix them both now instead of having to open the wall again when the other one starts to leak.
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How did the neighbor know where to look?
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On Friday, July 4, 2014 12:06:59 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

my neighbor said the previous owner had a leak in the same spot. Possibly the same joint.
marc
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On Friday, July 4, 2014 10:58:50 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Well, then maybe there's hope..... Whatever that mess is, maybe it was the previous owner or some hack that did it, not the guys who did the plumbing for the whole house.
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Except for the fact that the original connection leaked also so we don't know if the first plumber was any better than the last.
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Thanks for posting all the photos thru the end. I was going to suggest popping off one side of the stand, but you solved it. I wonder why the stand is sealed like that? I built one with 2x4 legs cross braced so I could use the space underneath or access the wall if needed later.
Also, around here we are required to have a pressure relief valve vented to the outside. Looks like this one doesn't have one - top right side connection. I would also run the drip pan pipe outside also. I had a slow water heater leak that went unnoticed for a month and no drip pan. Ended up being major headache drying out walls and floor, cleaning out mold....
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wrote:

Another good point. I have a fair amt of experience with tubing and small pipe, and when I put mine in, I followed the code to the letter. Even so I still had a plumber come and connect the gas and go over the entire installation to be sure I had some kind of receipt from a licensed plumber for the CYA file. Even so, I had to tell the plumber to install a drip leg and to use the correct length of flex pipe for the gass supply. Then had the gas company dude out for a final blessing.
For 21 -- you might also want to have the gas dude out, and have him check to be sure it is vented properly, right size & type of vent pipe, ceiling connection location, height of vent outlet above the roof, etc.
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