Water heater blanket for furnace supply plenum?

We have several high efficiency gas furnaces. The furnace itself is cool to the touch as are the insulated ducts. The only warm-to-hot part is the sheet metal supply plenum that is uninsulated.
Since the furance is in our unfinished basement, it seems logical to insulate the plenum right?
- Would a water heater blanket work well to insulate the plenum? - Any other suggestions for insultating material? (I know regular fiberglass batts are cheaper but I don't know if they are rated for contact with a supply plenum)?
Also as a related question, we have a circa 2003 water heater who outside is barely warm to the touch (if at all). Would there still be any measurably signiicant benefit to wrapping it in a water heater blanket or is it already well insulated enough?
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*There is insulation made for ducts. You can usually buy a roll at a plumbing supply. I have seen small rolls at Home Depot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your ROI, return on investment is minimal for either of these in an unfinished basement. Heat rises.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True about heat risin but still the 5 sides (floors & walls) are uninsulated stone & concrete so doesn't heat radiate there too. Even if "most" goes up into the house, doesn't the rest go out?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True about heat risin but still the 5 sides (floors & walls) are uninsulated stone & concrete so doesn't heat radiate there too. Even if "most" goes up into the house, doesn't the rest go out?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would like warm floors and insulate around the perimeter of the basement/crawl space.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heat also radiates downward and in all directions. A warm upstairs is still heating the downstairs, somewhat.
Insulating the basement will reduce overall energy consumption.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

unless it allows the basement to get too cold and freeze water using appliances and lines
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 9 Nov 2010 16:14:56 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

And HOW can insulating the basement allow the pipes to freeze when they don't in a non-insulated basement???? We are not tlaking insulating the loor between the basement and the main floor - we are talking insulating the outside walls of the basement - keeping the heat in. Thia way any heat lost by the furnace, hot water heater, duct work, etc - as well as heat lost through the floor, goes to heat the basement - keeping the floors warmer and reducing overal heating costs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.