Water filter

I'm new at this game so I definitely need assistance. I want to get a water filter system that will filter my drinking water at the tap and also filter the water going into my refrigerator. Can someone recommend a type and brand?
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Jack Allen wrote:

Step one. Identify the problem.
Why do you want a water filter? Different filters for different problems. Without a problem, you don't need a filter. Most people don't need a filter.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

NEED is irrelevant. He WANTS a water filter.
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I agree. I don't need someone to tell me I have a problem when the taste of the water tells me there is a problem.

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Jack Allen wrote:

Please don't take me wrong. I did not say YOU did not need a filter. I said you need to define a problem before selecting a filter and when I wrote that you have not provided any indication that you had defined the problem or what that problem might be. I might add that bad taste can be many different problems.
As for my comment that if you don't have a problem you don't need a filter; I believe it was a valid comment. I do not know you and you had not provided enough information for me to know what you were not just another poor consumer that had be caught up in that big advertising net.
Sorry if it sounded otherwise.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Absolutely no problem. I appreciate the input. Like I said I'm new at this game.

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water
filter
I use an whole house sediment filter. Keeps the lawn sprinklers and the pool running better. I change the filter out quarterly, looks like a cigarette filter each time. Pretty depressing that I would have been drinking, showering or washing with that water. I use a simple ice maker filter for drinking water and another filter ahead of my refrigerator. Replacing the external filter is a lot cheaper and easier than the one in my refer.
I researched and found the common causes of pollutants in my city water. Then bought filters that would solve those problems.
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Well I don't have city water. I just want a good tasting water to drink. And since I drink 1/2 gallon of iced tea each day, I want the ice cubes to taste the same.

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Jack Allen wrote:

You should have your water tested by a legit testing outfit (not Sears or a water treatment company) You may have a local government agency that will do that for you. Without know what the problem is, it is difficult to fix it.
You could just try a few and hope one works.
You may want to take a look at the Consumer Reports magazines at your library (free) or on line. I don't recall if they have done a report on them recently but it would be worth a try.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Sears
agency that

difficult to

Yes. As a matter of fact, we get annual reports from our water district. I believe they are required by law, state or federal. From it you can see what filtration stages might be a good idea. For example, you can see if you need a stage to remove the bad volatile stuff (VOC). Our report shows very low in that area, so I skipped that stage.
That said, though, it really does come down to a matter of taste and preferences, at least in developed areas, since laws require the water to be safe. But the laws do not require it to taste good.
One interesting point I learned when getting into these issues: the water district advises AGAINST the RO filtration systems. This is because chlorine must be removed to avoid destroying the membrane. Moreover, the RO filters are almost always (maybe always?) very low flow, so a storage tank is required (about 5 gallons). So, you have 5 gallons of unchlorinated water sitting in that tank and you go on vacation for a month. It is possible for something to get started growing in there, and the water folks will point this out if you call them and ask what they think about these systems. If you insist on putting them in anyway, as we did, you are advised to get in the habit of draining the tank and putting in a few drops of chlorine once in a while, especially after an long vacation.
Ed
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Since I have well water, no government agency tests my water nor is chlorine introduced into the system. I think I prefer the RO system. And what you said seemed to be good advice, one that I would adhere to.

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Many refrigerators with an ice maker state not to use it with an RO system. Something about tee pressure drops and the solenoid valve for the ice maker. You may want to check that out beforehand.
RO is probably the best way to purify the water, but some people say it tastes too flat as all the minerals have been removed.
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Thanks for that bit of important information. I will keep it in mind.

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system.
ice
There was nothing to that effect when we installed our GE refrigerator & Everpure system in 1996. They must be responding to complaints, but we have had no problems. Which is more than I can say for the old Kenmore without RO water, for which we replaced the icemaker several times due to buildup of deposits. No such buildup occurs with RO.

it
No accounting for tastes :-) We like it. Rather than shelling out for a 2nd RO unit we put an Everpure single-cartridge system in the master bath 2 years ago. It's an HR 100 as I recall, supposedly used in restaurants etc. for soft drink make-up water and coffee. Probably an activated carbon filter basically. In the middle of the night we still wander down the hallway to get a drink in the kitchen! In our remodel of the other bathroom, now in progress, I will tap off the line to the refrigerator so our guests will get the good stuff!
Ed
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From the GE manual; When connecting your refrigerator to a GE
Reverse Osmosis Water System, the only
approved installation is with a GE RVKit. For
other reverse osmosis water systems, follow
the manufacturers recommendations.
If the water supply to the refrigerator is from
a Reverse Osmosis Water Filtration System
AND the refrigerator also has a water filter,
use the refrigerators filter bypass plug. Using
the refrigerators water filtration cartridge in
conjunction with the RO filter can result in
hollow ice cubes and slower water flow from
the water dispenser.
This is from the KA manual.
IMPORTANT: The pressure of the water supply coming out of a
reverse osmosis system going to the water inlet valve of the
refrigerator needs to be between 30 and 120 psi (207 - 827 kPa).
If a reverse osmosis water filtration system is connected to your
cold water supply, the water pressure to the reverse osmosis
system needs to be a minimum of 40 to 60 psi (276 - 414 kPa).
If the water pressure to the reverse osmosis system is less than
40 to 60 psi (276 - 414 kPa):
 Check to see whether the sediment filter in the reverse
osmosis system is blocked. Replace the filter if necessary.
 Allow the storage tank on the reverse osmosis system to refill
after heavy usage.
 If your refrigerator has a water filter cartridge, it may further
reduce the water pressure when used in conjunction with a
reverse osmosis system. Remove the water filter cartridge.
See Water Filtration System.
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Pretty easy to put them back in, though.
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And how would that be?

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water
filter
I have an Omni under-the-sink filter for the kitchen tap. It has 2 stage filters. I notice a big difference in taste and clarity with it. Plus, I have small kids and lead solder, so it hopefully helps there. Although just running the tap for a minute or two probably clears the lead. You can buy different filters in different combinations for whatever problem you're trying to address. Some can filter asbestos and MTBE. Reverse osmosis systems are supposedly the best, but they're more expensive and require a tank under the cabinet.
I also purchased a GE brand in-line filter for the icemaker in my fridge. You just splice it into the copper line.
You can get a whole-house system, but in my case it would be filtering before the lead solder. And I see no point in washing clothes, cars, dishes, in filtered water.
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You want a charcoal filter cartridge. There are a few types available that will suit your needs. The most cost effective is one that goes in the cold water line tot he kitchen sink and is ahead of where the fridge is tapped off. That way, one filter does both. You don't need to filter the hot water or the entire house.
I have an Ista-Pur from Water Pic, but many other brands exist. Most are fairly simple to install with minimal tools, and no soldering. Often referred to as "under sink" they can be installed in the basement if that is easier to get to.
If the refrigerator tap is before the kitchen line, you can use an in-line filter for that.
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I installed the Everpure ROM II about 8-9 years ago. It has two cartridges, one of which is Reverse Osmosis (RO) and the other is a prefilter. The prefilter removes chlorine and dirt kinds of things, both of which would harm the RO cartridge. The RO removes dissolved solids. The system produces excellent drinking water. And, not wanting anything less in iced drinks, I ran a line up through the wall, through the atttic, and down to the refrigerator ice maker. There is a bit of sticker shock with this system, but IMHO you will find none better. The cartridges are also expensive, but they need to be replaced very seldom, at least in our area. As I recall, I've replaced the RO cartridge twich since installing it, the first time probably unnecessarily since I had not yet bought the dissolved solids tester to see when it's needed.
As a separate issue, we have a water softener processes all the water going to indoor taps, hot and cold. This keeps deposits off shower walls and sinks. We used Kenmore softeners for years, but the last time I put a system together myself using a Clack WS-1 valve. I really like it.
Ed

a water

filter
and
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