Water-damaged exterior doors

I have two exterior doors that are water damaged. They are typical wood fremed - masonite skinned doors. They were properly painted and sealed when installed about 5 years ago but the masonite has become water-logged, has bubbled and has delaminated from the frame.
I have done my best to reduce the water that spashes onto the doors but now must repair the doors. I think there is no point in re- skinning them with masonite.
I understand there are fibreglas doors made for use in damp areas. I can't afford to replace the doors but could I re-skin them with fibreglass in place of the masonite?
What would you use to repair a door such as this?? Can I purchase fibreglass sheets such as used in fibreglas exterior doors?? Can you suggests another repair method.
Thanks, Eric
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RubEric wrote:

...
Don't have any really better suggestions other than install storm doors if they fail that rapidly and aren't going to replace them.
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I don't know of any process to skin doors with fiberglass.
I would remove the door and sand it thoroughly until smooth. Use a patching compound (2 part with hardener at hardware store like Bondo) to fill any imperfections and make the door smooth again. Completely remove any rotted or softened wood/masonite and fix with the patching compound.
After sanding and patching to satisfaction, paint with a good sealing primer like Kilz and a quality paint. Glossy Oil based paint may stand up better to moisture so use a compatible primer if you use Oil or Latex. Make sure to paint all surfaces especially the bottom of the door. You may need to remove and replace any weather strip that might be there. Use 2 coats min, 3 or 4 near the bottom for extra protection.
Finally address the source of the moisture by whatever means is necessary. Fix the gutter, replace the door sill, install a cement stoop, put in a storm door, whatever it takes.
A fiberglass or steel replacement door would be best. Cost for the door is not bad if you can install it yourself. Steel and fiberglass doors with wood edges can sometimes be planed to fit an existing opening
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Masonite sucks in water prone areas. It only survives (sometimes) when it's primed and painted, especially edges, right off at install and never let go until you can see it needs painting again. Paint before it needs painting.
Replace the door with a new prehung steel door. Around here, $125. You get new door, hinges, weatherstrip, exterior brick mold, sill and jambs. Hopefully you can install it yourself. If not, learn. In the end you'll be happier.
And mind what "pipedown" said about addressing the source of the moisture. Steel doors can rust at the bottom when beat with moisture badly for extended periods. The jambs are wood and can rot. Seal the bottoms of exterior brick molding with primer. And if you really want to cap the seal, smear with silicone.
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