Water damage to carpet floor and ceiling due to overflowing flush tank

Hi all,
Yesterday the flush tank on the second floor overflowed and caused a little bit of flooding. About 40 square feet of tiled area and 10 square feet of carpeted area was covered in water. Water leaked through the floor and damaged the ceiling on the first floor.
I managed to shut off the leak before it did much damage. Water probably leaked for about 15-20 minutes. The ceiling is intact, with very little water marks.
Today we had a restoration expert come in and he plans to - remove the wet carpet - put a large fan to dry carpet padding - Put a large fan to dry the tiles - Cut the sheet rock on the first floor ceiling - Put a large fan to dry the ceiling
I talked with a few other people (not in water damage restoration business) and they claim, we don't have to do all this. Every thing will dry out and it is unlikely for mold to appear with this little amount of water. According to them, I should dry out the carpet with a fan. Ceiling will be ok, sheet rock is supposed to absorb water.
Now, I am considering whether to let the professional do the job or wait for the carpet to dry?
What have been your experiences? Any suggestions on what is the right thing to do?
TIA
Abhi
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Based on your description, I would:
1. Make certain the leak is *really* fixed. You don't want any more water coming in!
2. Help the area dry out as quickly as possible. Maximise the ventilation, turn on heating if appropriate, deploy fans, possibly lift the carpet (depending on how much water seemed to be lurking in or under it), move furniture, and whatever.
3. Wait a few days for the area to dry out thoroughly and then re-assess what repairs will be required.
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My AC unite clogged the overflow pan ran over the only way I found out is when there was a water stain in the ceiling. I let it dry for about 2 weeks used OIL BASE primer ( cover stain) 2 coats then painted. AS for the carpet I would pull it out and dry it or replace it, But that might depend on how saturated carpet and pad are. I can't imagine the water hurting the tile and doubt that much water got threw. Another thing to remember is these guys are out to make money nothing wrong with that, but it is easy to take advantage of someone. Also if you go threw tour home owners insurance they might raise your rates so it might be better to pay out of pocket, that's something to look into.

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As I noted in another post--your homeowner's insurance will cover any damage and restoration costs associated with this type of appliance failure. In the course of any restoration if new code requirements lead to increased costs your insurance will (or should, if you have proper coverage) pay for that too. Don't take any short cuts---most restoration companies will pull everything thing out that has been water damaged. I had the same type of toilet failure and even had the tile floors (two of them) ripped up and replaced. I was away for the two or three days the water must have been running and had extensive water damage. Insurance company covered all but $200 deductible including about $2000 to 3000 in required code upgrades (new vent pipe(s). drain line, exhaust fan, GFI's, electrical service box etc.). It wasn't easy fighting the insurance company but when finally challenged to get a contractor who would do the job for what they offered, they gave in. MLD
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MLD wrote:

That was part of the reason why our insurance premiums increase each year. I never used my home insurance, and I guess I am just paying for some of those people to upgrade their homes or pay for the regular maintenance such as roof replacement.
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damage
In
for
pull
of
but
(new
etc.).
challenged to

in.
What a dumb remark. If you have a legitimate loss and get several estimates, why wouldn't you make a claim, that's what you pay premiums for. My damage was close to $25,000; two bathrooms, one under the other were wiped out--Are you suggesting that I should have eaten the repair costs and not put in a claim? Are you also suggesting that a contractor violate code requirements, especially when the work has to be inspected by the city plumbing and electrical inspectors? Are you afraid of your insurance company? MLD
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abhi wrote:

How did this happen? Doesn't it have an overflow drain?
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