Water Accumulating inside Refrigerator

Background:
I have a Kenmore refrigerator that's about 10 years old. It's an over/ under two door model with a freezer on top above the refrigerator. I had it in a rental house with the ice maker hooked up and functioning for several years. The ice maker ended up leaking, flooding everything, and ruining much of the hard wood floors. I immediately unhooked the ice maker from the water supply. I told the tenants that I would not replace it and they'd have to start using ice cube trays. During the insurance claim process, I called in a repair man to remove the ice maker from the refrigerator and confirm that the malfunctioning ice maker was the cause of the water leak.
Problem:
Since that time, my tenants complained that water would accumulate below the crisper drawers at the bottom of the refrigerator. (However, it was not hooked up to any water supply at that time) They were afraid that it would leak out onto the new hard wood floors again. So, I purchased a new refrigerator the rental home and took the problematic one home to my garage. Since it is only 10 years old, it is newer (and bigger) than the twenty year old garage refrigerator I currently use. So, I'd like to replace my older one (currently in use) with the newer one (pulled from the rental house). I assuming that the water that is accumulating under the crisper must be the freezer defrosting and/or condensation since it was not hooked to a water supply. I thought that this type of run off ended up all the way under the refrigerator in a drip pan to evaporate. I was wondering if when the repair man changed the routing of the run off defrost and condensation water when he yanked the broken ice maker out of the freezer. Does that sound feasible? If so, can it easily be checked/fixed so any run off accumulates under the refrigerator instead of inside the refrigerator?
All thoughts shared on this subject are appreciated.
-- Joe
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Background:
I have a Kenmore refrigerator that's about 10 years old. It's an over/ under two door model with a freezer on top above the refrigerator. I had it in a rental house with the ice maker hooked up and functioning for several years. The ice maker ended up leaking, flooding everything, and ruining much of the hard wood floors. I immediately unhooked the ice maker from the water supply. I told the tenants that I would not replace it and they'd have to start using ice cube trays. During the insurance claim process, I called in a repair man to remove the ice maker from the refrigerator and confirm that the malfunctioning ice maker was the cause of the water leak.
Problem:
Since that time, my tenants complained that water would accumulate below the crisper drawers at the bottom of the refrigerator. (However, it was not hooked up to any water supply at that time) They were afraid that it would leak out onto the new hard wood floors again. So, I purchased a new refrigerator the rental home and took the problematic one home to my garage. Since it is only 10 years old, it is newer (and bigger) than the twenty year old garage refrigerator I currently use. So, I'd like to replace my older one (currently in use) with the newer one (pulled from the rental house). I assuming that the water that is accumulating under the crisper must be the freezer defrosting and/or condensation since it was not hooked to a water supply. I thought that this type of run off ended up all the way under the refrigerator in a drip pan to evaporate. I was wondering if when the repair man changed the routing of the run off defrost and condensation water when he yanked the broken ice maker out of the freezer. Does that sound feasible? If so, can it easily be checked/fixed so any run off accumulates under the refrigerator instead of inside the refrigerator?
All thoughts shared on this subject are appreciated.
-- Joe
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When I have had similar problems, thoroughly defrosting the unit solved the problem. Also, make sure that the drain tube down from the freezer to the drain pan is clean.
Bob
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I found it due to lint getting in the drain tube. Took a long piece of hookup wire and threaded it through the tube. Needed to do this about once a year. PITA.
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Bob F wrote:

Similarly check that the drain at the bottom of the refrigerator to the drip pan is open. I had to clear mine several times.
-- bud--
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