wasps nest

I have had tyo take down two wasps nests on my new house. Any ideas to keep them from coming back?
birdfeeders or anything like that?
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Be sure to knock down the nest. But then they just move to another spot. Trick is to inspect very often, and when one gets started, knock it completely off there. I used a long cane fishing pole.
Steve
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wrote:

The wasp/hornet spray will repel them for a week or two.
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Phisherman wrote:

Thank you. I have sprayed the first one, it was 10 feet high (top of gargage door), this second one is 25 feet up above garage (need two ladders...).
What is a known predator for a wasp? Can a buy an owl to patrol the skies around my house. LOL
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wrote:

It seems like the most dangerous aspect of wasps are the extreames people go to in killing them. Wasps are really pretty harmless, particularly 25 feet away.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

the nest in 25 feet above my front door... if this was the back of my house with no entrances, agreed.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says... :) :) snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
:) > wrote: :) > :) > > :) > >Phisherman wrote:
:) > >> wrote: :) > >> :) > >> >I have had tyo take down two wasps nests on my new house. Any ideas to :) > >> >keep them from coming back? :) > >> > :) > >> >birdfeeders or anything like that? :) > >> :) > >> :) > >> The wasp/hornet spray will repel them for a week or two. :) > > :) > >Thank you. I have sprayed the first one, it was 10 feet high (top of :) > >gargage door), this second one is 25 feet up above garage (need two :) > >ladders...). :) > > :) > >What is a known predator for a wasp? Can a buy an owl to patrol the :) > >skies around my house. LOL :) > :) > :) > It seems like the most dangerous aspect of wasps are the extreames :) > people go to in killing them. Wasps are really pretty harmless, :) > particularly 25 feet away. :) :) the nest in 25 feet above my front door... if this was the back of my :) house with no entrances, agreed. :) :) If they are paper wasps, the inverted umbrella type nest, even if it were 5 feet above the front door there will be no issue other than evidence of the droppings on the porch. I have seen wasps that were aggressive but they were much lower and probably were tired of the homeowner spraying them with the water hose trying to knock the nest down. It "trained" the wasps to attack on any motion within ten feet of the nest, several people and pets were stung by the usually non aggressive paper wasps.
--
Lar

It is said that the early bird gets the worm,
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On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 16:53:11 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com quickly quoth:

If you find a nest too close to a door, spray it down with a high-pressure nozzle (Little brass cone, $2 or less at Big Lots) from a water hose.

I was working on a neighbor's car the other day. I opened the driver side door and heard a crunchy paper sound then saw the 30 yellow jackets fly out. I slowly walked back about 5' and stopped to watch. They all flew past me and calmed down. We removed the nest and stepped on it. I worked under the hood for the next hour. They flew around me, landing on the door opening about a foot and a half from me, looking for their old nest. I didn't bother them, they didn't bother me.
Zen Lesson of the Day: Become one with these beneficial insects. They remove a lot of pests which would otherwise bother you. ;)
--
Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight
very clean. It\'s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands.
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I've basically had the same experience as you with various stinging critters. I've hammered, sawed, painted, shingled, pressure washed, you name it around them without directing anything at them. I've found them to be very curious actually. Had one that actually followed me around hovering where I was working . No question. It did follow me. I never messed with it and it reciprocated.
Have a season here where those big fat bumble bees are around in huge numbers. Walked in to the middle of like 50 of them in a radius. They knew I was there and were a bit excited. I just stopped and stood. They flew around me. Then one came and "bumped" me around the head. I didn't react (externally anyway). A short bit later it came and bumped me again. Obviously this bump was intentional and a message. I walked slowly backwards. They seemed satisfied and didn't follow.
Someday this attitude is gonna get me though. I've seen the shows on TV about them. I recall there are species of wasps that are extremely agressive. Sortta like the old lady. No reason needed to get pissed and attack.
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On Sun, 03 Sep 2006 21:23:54 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Al

My girlfriend were walking around and checking out the gardens surrounding a local restaurant (Summer Jo's, Grants Pass, OR) when we suddenly found ourselves in the middle of a noisy freeway. I asked "What's that sound?" just as I realized where we were. We had walked within about 10 feet of the rows of beehives there. It was truly fascinating. They flew around us as if we weren't there and we did a 360-degree fascination sweep, watching hundreds or thousands of busy workers flying by. It was goosebump time. A couple minutes later, we walked back away from the hives and it quieted down just as quickly as we had stumbled into them.

Yabbut, you'll amaze many people and just have fun before that possible scenario happens. Nature is great when you let it be.
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A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
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wrote:

http://whatsthatbug.com/robberflies.html
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<<Any ideas to keep them from coming back? >>
I had one over my front door that kept reappearing after spraying. I finally threw a bucket of soapy water on the nest and they never returned. Might be just a coincidence, since I only have a sample size of one. Perhaps the soap left a residue that was unattractive to the wasps.
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Sure as heck worth a try. Was it Dawn? Lemon or Rain scent? ;-)
Some dish soap in combination with mouthwash and tobacco juice is GREAT for keeping down aphids on tomato plants. Cheap, and no toxins. You can eat the tomatoes by just cleaning. Lessin', of course, you like chewbaccy juice.
Mix up a gallon and try it. Boil about a gallon of water and throw in some Day's Work tobacco. About a cubic inch. Let it steep like ice tea. Strain through a tea strainer or cloth. A couple tablespoons of mouthwash and a couple tablespoons of ANY liquid soap. Spray with any spray bottle.
Steve
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Generally speaking, if you give them enough grief, they will move away, even if you don't kill them all. Just like most of us... ;-)
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try hanging a sign near the nest that says "no wasps allowed" ;)
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A container with moth balls will do the trick. I use one of those fishing bait containers.
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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Birds that come to feeders eat seed. Birds that eat insects will take wasps but not enough to significantly reduce the wasps' numbers, as far as I've ever been able to tell, having lived in a very birdy and waspy location. That whole "balance of nature" thing, I suppose :-)
Jo Ann
jIM wrote:

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I don't think you can stop them from coming back. I get them every year, year after year.
What kind of wasps? Paper wasps with little honeycomb nests that look like upside down umbrellas? These are non-aggressive, like honey bees. They would build a nest under the eaves of my doorway. I'd look up and have a wasp nest 12 inches from my nose. They ignored me. I took them down because I didn't want to slam the door and make them mad. They are gentle, but will still defend their nests.
Mud daubers are solitary wasps that are gentle like paper wasps, I leave them all alone so long as they aren't on my house or a heavily trafficked area.
Yellow jackets? Bald faced hornets (black and white wasps)? Kill with extreme prejudice. They will defend their nests aggressively.

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