Washing Machine Lint Trap / Drain Protector


My washing machine drain pipe recently was having trouble keeping up with the spin cycle discharge, so I had the line snaked. All appears ok now, but I'd like to prevent this in the future. Has anyone had success with lint trap or filter for their washer?
The machine is a Kenmore / Whirlpool and the parts guide lists whirlpool part # 367031 "Drain Protector" or "Drain Protectant" http://www.whirlpool.com/catalog/accessory_product.jsp?src=Search&categoryId82&productId 4
It doesn't list if any additional parts are necessary to connect the protector to the discharge hose, or where it is installed. It appears to have a 90 degree angle between input and output, which has me puzzled.
Or is there another type of lint trap from another supplier that works better? I'd appreciate any suggestions and experiences.
Thanks!
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Jeff Taylor wrote:

http://www.whirlpool.com/catalog/accessory_product.jsp?src=Search&categoryId82&productId 4
I don't understand how that Whirlpool lint trap is supposed to work, never having seen one, but you can get the wire mesh lint trap bags at any hardware store, home center or buy them in bulk on eBay. They come with zip ties to hold them in place. Cheap, easy, disposable.
R
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I grew up seeing old nylon hosiery tied on the discharge of the washing machine's hose into the utility tub. It worked fine. Kinda creeped me out, of course, but it worked fine.
When I had a discharge like this, the $1.00 kit at most grocery stores or Target, or Walmart that has the mesh sock lookin deal works great too. Even comes with a wire tie.
I've never had to have anything snaked on a laundry tub line. And can't remember any such from childhood either.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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snipped-for-privacy@toddh.net (Todd H.) wrote:

I agree... A modern plumbing system with no other problems would easily handle any washer lint - compared to what else goes down it. :)
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Rick Blaine wrote:

How about a septic system? Synthetic fibers don't break down in a septic tank or leaching field. They just accumulate it and block the drainage and they you have an expensive problem.
R
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Non-soluable material in a septic tank either floats or sinks. The tank is designed to draw from the liquids in the center of the tank. Any fiber would get pumped out of the tank with all the sludge during the normal cleanout every couple of years.
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Rick Blaine wrote:

Having lived and worked for several decades in an area that did not have sewers, I can assure you that your theory is perfect...in theory. Some people go years without having the things pumped out, and others are on a maintenance schedule. Some households do a few washer loads a week, others do several a day.
As in everything else construction - everything in life, really - preventative maintenance is far cheaper and easier. Changing a lint trap at the washer outlet takes two minutes and costs a buck. So for half an hour's work and a twenty dollar bill you're postponing pumping. How much does it cost in your area to pump out a tank?
R
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"Todd H." wrote:

Maybe I'm just "lucky." The line is cast iron and goes under the basement slab underneath the standpipe. It's only 2.5-3 inches until it meets the main soil line underground. I'll check out that kit at Target. Thanks!
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