Washing Machine Install

I'm replumbing my laundry room for a washing maching and have two questions about the drain pipe.
1) The old drain pipe doesn't appear to have a trap. Is this typical for washing machine drains? I think I can fit in a running trap (U-trap?) if needed.
2) An old general home repair book advises installing the drain pipe so the outlet is no lower than the wash tub water level -- to "ward against overflow." Since the book was written about 25 years ago, I'm wondeirng if this still applies. It's possible I could get the drain pipe up to the level of the tub, approx 35" but there's a vent pipe in the same wall where I'm working that is in the way.
Kevin
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1. My reference "Plumbing a House" by Peter Hemp calls for a "P" trap mounted 6" to 18" above the floor. 2. Same reference calls for the stand pipe to end 36" above the floor.
TB
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A trap is necessary. Not all traps are installed in view, though. I'd think you'd smell sewer gas if there was no trap.

It still applies. There is no device that shuts off the water between the wash tub and the drain hose. The hose has to be installed with the u-bend above the highest water level in the tub or the water will siphon out. When you install the hose high enough the machine just has to turn on the pump to drain and only has to turn the pump off to stop draining.
I have an issue in the other direction. My washer is in the basement and has to pump up about 5' from the top of the washer. So far so good (for about 2 years). But I've heard it's better to drain into a laundry sink (or what ever they're called). I suppose that may be an option for you if there's room for a laundry tub next to your washer. Then you'd have an extra sink large enough to fill buckets and such. Plus I've heard it is wise over the long haul to run the washer drain water through a nylon sock to catch the lint that can clog drains eventually. The socks are cheap to replace and can be attached to the end of the drain hose. I don't think there's a way to filter the water unless you drain to a sink though.
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On Sat, 1 Oct 2005 09:22:38 -0400, "Olaf"

I can verify this. I just bought a brand new Maytag washer. The sales man said more or less the same thing.
My drain connection is only about a foot off the floor so before I put the washer in place I loosened one of the screws that holds the back on near the top of the washer. I made a loop out of 16ga galvanized wire and bent small hooks in the ends of the wire that I slipped between the screw head and the back cover. Then re tightened the screw. The hose runs through the loop and is held above the highest possible water level.

The only thing about this that bothers me is the additional strain you are putting on the pump by making it lift the column of water 5 feet. But it seems to be working for you and I have learned not to fix what is not broken. ( Learned it the hard way too. )

As far as filtering the water in line.... Not that I know of. I worked for two years at a plumbing supply warehouse and I dont remember ever seeing anything like that.
As for draining into a laundry tub... The sock works and is cheap. They do make a laundry filter for wash sinks. It's like a stainless steel scrubby pad in the shape of...... a sock. Fits on the end of the hose.
My connection is a direct hook up to the sewer. I feed the hose to a 3/4 X 6 plastic nipple that is threaded into a 1 1/2 PVC X 3/4 Threaded bushing. The run to the main house drain is a long one and is under the concrete of the basement floor. I have never had a problem with lint buildup and it has been set up like this for many many years. ( Knock wood )
The only drawback I can see to a direct hook up is if you have frequent sewer backups. I dont know what all that toilet paper would do to the pump but it could not be good for it.
Anyway that's me.
House Mouse
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Thanks for all the helpful input.
Kevin
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A trap is necessary. Not all traps are installed in view, though. I'd think you'd smell sewer gas if there was no trap.

It still applies. There is no device that shuts off the water between the wash tub and the drain hose. The hose has to be installed with the u-bend above the highest water level in the tub or the water will siphon out. When you install the hose high enough the machine just has to turn on the pump to drain and only has to turn the pump off to stop draining.
I have an issue in the other direction. My washer is in the basement and has to pump up about 5' from the top of the washer. So far so good (for about 2 years). But I've heard it's better to drain into a laundry sink (or what ever they're called). I suppose that may be an option for you if there's room for a laundry tub next to your washer. Then you'd have an extra sink large enough to fill buckets and such. Plus I've heard it is wise over the long haul to run the washer drain water through a nylon sock to catch the lint that can clog drains eventually. The socks are cheap to replace and can be attached to the end of the drain hose. I don't think there's a way to filter the water unless you drain to a sink though.
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