Washing Machine drains into Shower

I have a washing machine and a shower in my basement. They are separated by a wall. When the washing machine drains the water comes up the shower drain. Most of the time it doesn't overflow and after a few minutes the shower drains itself. Every once in a while it will overflow in the shower and not drain at all, like yesterday. I ran a 25 foot snake down the drain and it now acts as it always has.
I'd like for the washing machine not have water come up the shower drain. Is it just a clog in the drain or is there something else, like poor design, in play here?
TIA for any ideas.
BR
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re: I ran a 25 foot snake down the drain and it now acts as it always has.
Please explain "now it acts like it always has".
I can't tell from your post if "acts like it always has" means it's now just backing up into the shower a little bit or now it's draining completely with no back up. In other words, has this set-up *ever* worked properly, or has it always backed up into the shower?
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After running the snake, the shower still backs up and then eventually drains. It has always acted in this manner.
Thanks.
BR
wrote:

re: I ran a 25 foot snake down the drain and it now acts as it always has.
Please explain "now it acts like it always has".
I can't tell from your post if "acts like it always has" means it's now just backing up into the shower a little bit or now it's draining completely with no back up. In other words, has this set-up *ever* worked properly, or has it always backed up into the shower?
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Big Bubba wrote:

Obviously the washing machine is dumping water faster than the drain can process it. Possibilities seem to be:
* Turbo motor on the washing machine pump * Semi-blocked drain line * Drain line too small
Since the only one you have any control over is possible blockage, do what you can in that area (chemicals, hot water, scouring, etc.).
Plumbing contractors can insert a video camera in the drain and inspect its whole length - you may have a root infestation or a collapsed pipe.
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Big Bubba wrote:

How does the shower drain get up to the sewer line? A sump pump? or is the basement level above the sewer drain? Draw me a picture.
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I really don't know. We do have a sump pump, but it only kicks in when it rains. The basement is below ground level, although we are on top of a small hill.
Thanks.
BR

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I;d put my money on poor venting. Maybe no venting from a previous DIY project.
Joe
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This is an old house, built in 1916. The previous owner put a lot of poor work into the house. The plumbing ain't great, but the electrical work is even worse.
Do you know of any resolution for this problem, assuming it is venting?
Thanks.
BR
wrote:

I;d put my money on poor venting. Maybe no venting from a previous DIY project.
Joe
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Big Bubba wrote:

Put in a vent?
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I'm not arguing...I'm just curious...
How would venting - or lack thereof - cause this problem?
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I'm not arguing...I'm just curious...
How would venting - or lack thereof - cause this problem?
Try this.. Take a liter pop bottle and fill with water. Hold it upside down and note how fast the water drains. Next, fill it again, cap it, turn it upside down and drill some air holes in the highest point. Uncap it and notice how much faster it drains with the vent holes.
This applies to plumbing as well. I have the same problem with my washer and sink. The washer forces alot a water under pressure in the unvented drain line and it backs up into the sink due to slow draining.
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He already has a vent, the basement shower opening.
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wrote:

re: "He already has a vent, the basement shower opening"
Wouldn't the shower opening only become a vent if the water was sucked out of the trap?
It sounds like the opposite is happening - water is entering the trap from the discharge side keeping the trap full at all times.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

I agree....
AFAIK the purpose of venting is to "break the vacuum" which can suck a trap dry, leaving a path open for sewer gases to enter the property.
I think his problem is just a "slow" drain which can't handle the full flow from the washer.
He might try this simple solution:
Take a small woodworker's clamp and put it on the washer drain hose, squeezing it down enough to restrict the discharge flow rate until water stops backing up into the shower. It will take a bit longer to drain the washer, but shouldn't damage anything.
Jeff
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re: restrict the discharge flow rate until water stops backing up into the shower
Might work...might not.
My washer drains into the utility tub. I use one of these to catch the lint:
http://www.agindustrialsupply.com //(S(yllfwuijsivd0xrzgjucaaug))/productdetails.aspx?sku=10603639
If it gets too clogged it causes back-pressure and the machine doesn't pump the water out. I think it's a "protection mechanism" so the pump doesn't burn itself out.
If he clamps the hose too much, the washer might not drain at all.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

http://www.agindustrialsupply.com //(S(yllfwuijsivd0xrzgjucaaug))/productdetails.aspx?sku603639
Or:
http://tinyurl.com/9behve
Boy, those sure look like Vatican approved condums, don't they?

Could be, I've only used that trick once myself years ago and it worked for me. The washing machines then probably wern't as smart about things like drain backpressure as they have become lately.
Jeff
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Sometimes I think they're too smart.
I on my way out into the snow to pick up a $3.83 piece of plastic so my washer will know that the door is closed.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 23:36:06 +0000, JohnR66 wrote:

I just read some Web sites that try to explain the plumbing sewer line venting (just Google, and there are a lot of hits.)
The information I got was the new vent would comes after the 'P' or 'J' trap on the OP's basement shower drain, which from Big Bubba's description this trap most likely is under, or in, the basement slab. And then the vent stack must be installed to go all the way to the roof of the house and extend a foot or more above the roof.
Just how expensive would it get to cut the basement concrete to find the drain line, cut the holes in the floors and ceiling to insert the vent stack, cut thru the roof, water proof the roof, fix the basement floor, install some sort of drywall around the new stack above the basement, paint the drywall until Mrs. Bubba is satisfied the old and new drywall are color-painted matched, and so on. (when you cut the whole for the stack in the ceiling of the room above the basement, you are on your own about the drywall dust and staining the carpet with respect to Mrs Bubba.)
I mean couldn't this get kind of expensive in today's economy? For just to stop a few gallons of water from bubbling up in a basement shower drain? Well who knows, maybe Big Bubba is working a massive amount of Overtime at work, or won the Lottery.
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Perhaps your Google search missed this type of product:
http://www.oatey.com/Channel/Shared/ProductGroupDetail/278/In_Line_Vent.html
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wrote:

You may have a clogged vent. If the vent is more than 5 feet away from the trap, you may need a revent.
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