Washing machine drain tight connection

My washer has a pump that is too strong for the drains in this old house. From what I have heard, some kind of tight connection is OK as long as the washer has a pumped drain and not a gravity type.
Being an expert seat of the pants, shade tree type feller, I thought I better pass this by the pros here before I throw the switch.
I already rooted out the drain all the way to the sewer, and the roof vent is clear. Still not quite big enough for the newer washer.
Sketch of what I'm think about doing:
http://imageshack.us/f/856/washerd.gif/
Many thanks,
Bob
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On 1/5/2012 1:50 AM, Guv Bob wrote:

From what I have heard, some kind of tight connection is OK as long as the washer has a pumped drain and not a gravity type.

You were given very bad advise. There is no easy fix. Fix the drain properly.
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wrote:

What size pipe is the washer hose going into?
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wrote:

Sounds like a capacity issue in the drain line, your washer pump is emptying the machine faster than your drain line can drain the water away...
How long of a run at the smaller pipe size before the drain line for your washer empties into a larger size pipe or the main stack ?
You should also check to ensure the line in question is properly and adequately vented, water drains much slower through improperly vented lines than it does through properly vented ones -- it is difficult to break the vacuum on a poorly vented line and if you seal the connection as you have indicated your washer won't be able to introduce air into the line like the "loose" drain connections...
~~ Evan
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Check your drain pipe all the way from the washer to the sewer pipe. There is NO WAY that a washer can overload a 4" sewer pipe UNLESS that pipe is blocked.
Try renting one of those inspection cams that you can send down your drain pipe, if need be.
Alternately, put a wash tub next to your washer and and use it as a temporary overflow basin by limiting the outflow from it.
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wrote:

Your sketch omits the drain vent....... pumping water into the drain at a rate higher than it can accept will most likely wind up with water being pumped up the vent line.
The good news is...... this will increase the head (pressure) in the drain line and thus increase the flow in the drain.
The bad news ....... water might be pumped out of the roof vent.
I would suggest a laundry sink, holding tank or a drain line re-pipe from the washer at least to where the drain bumps up to 2" or 3".
cheers Bob
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Rooting out the drain does not necessarily say it is clear for the full diameter all that distance, unless the head of the rooter is full drain diameter. A laundry tub is the quick and easy way to slow down the input to the sewer. A full rodding of the drain line with a full diameter head on the rooter is the only other solution.
wrote:

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It is also possible the drain line is too small diameter. I had a friend, one time. Washing machine would back up the drain and pour all over the floor. Turns out the PVC drain line was too small dimaeter. The cure turned out to be replace all that PVC with larger size.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Rooting out the drain does not necessarily say it is clear for the full diameter all that distance, unless the head of the rooter is full drain diameter. A laundry tub is the quick and easy way to slow down the input to the sewer. A full rodding of the drain line with a full diameter head on the rooter is the only other solution.
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You could try raising (extending) the drain the the maximum height recommended by the washing machine manufacturer.
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wrote:

Problem ?
No... You have not yet had the "problem" which is going to come soon...
You will have your clearly undersized drain line partially blocked with whatever and the drain hose from the washing machine will blow out explosively and the water in the machine will just be pumped out onto the floor... Since it is now the weakest element in the piping and most washing machines have a one-way back-flow prevention device inside the machine in the drain line so that sewage can't back up into the machine...
~~ Evan
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yeah the bdrain line is way undersized, this will cause future troubles and washer pumps arent designed for pressure, which maay eventually damage the pump.
and slower emptying makes pump and spin run longer increasingn energy costs
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yeah the bdrain line is way undersized, this will cause future troubles and washer pumps arent designed for pressure, which maay eventually damage the pump.
and slower emptying makes pump and spin run longer increasingn energy costs
Thanks. What do you think about this idea - see sketch. It would be nearly impossible to get at the existing standpipe and drain connection below.
http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/305/drain05.jpg
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wrote:

so where are you draing the excess water? might be easier to just drain all of it there.
how bad of a job to acess the hard to reach part of the line?
or you could install a grinder / sewage pump. it includes a tank and pump to send the drain water to a better drain location
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so where are you draing the excess water? might be easier to just drain all of it there.
how bad of a job to acess the hard to reach part of the line?
or you could install a grinder / sewage pump. it includes a tank and pump to send the drain water to a better drain location
===
The overflow would be run out the wall into a drainage ditch. When I put it in, I measured the drain flow of the new washer as 6 GPM max -- same as the previous washer.
Like someone said, I think the most likely problem is the drain pipe needs rooting out. It's been 15 years at least since that was done.
The old washer had a lint filter and caught a 1/2-teaspoon full of link with a typical full load. According to GE, the new one "grinds up" the lint so "there is no need for one." That's BS.
New washer is GE Model WHRE5550K1WW. Don't EVER get one. It's one of those "water-saver" jobs with a tiny agitator. The clothes just slosh around.
I kept the old one -- when the new goes out (hopefully soon) I'll replace the transmission in the old one and put it back in. About $250 parts & labor last time I checked.
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