Washers - Front Load vs. Top Load

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the industry said "they'll never sell at that price". Well, Maytag sold so many that they couldn't keep up for a while. The other manufacturers realized there was a market for high dollar machines and quickly entered the foray. I suspect that the price is high because they can get it....and by getting it, they make some money for a change. Most people don't realize that the average retailer (because of competition holding down prices) only nets about 2 cents on the dollar on most appliance sales. That's why the big push for add ons like extended warranties. I had a sales manager tell me one time that if I couldn't sell the warranty, let the customer walk as it wasn't worth it to sell the appliance without it. I've noticed that the foreign companies like LG are coming in with mostly just the fancy high dollar stuff where there is some margin to work with. If you want a really cheap appliance with little profit for the retailer, you'll still find that with an American manufacturers name on it.
Tom.
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Ian wrote:

I replaced my 29 yr. old Kenmore washer a year ago, with another Kenmore top loader; after reading all the spec's at the Sears web site and other places, on both types.
I think everyone has pointed out the differences to consider. As for me I couldn't see a big advantage to a front loader, especially for the price difference. I bought a larger unit to wash fewer loads. The energy guide said it would cost $32 a year to operate [with 8 loads a week]. As for the water consumption, I didn't think that would make much difference in my household. And it is so quiet. :)
And besides that, I like the look of the boxes vs the laundromat look. My w/d are black. ;) Purely personal factors all, only you can decide. bj
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The price.
I'm old enough to remember when all residential washers were front load. I think they went to top load because it was less expensive to manufacture, due to no need to seal the door against leakage. Also, the older front-loaders were lower capacity.

The lack of an agitator is gentler on the clothes, and the front loaders use less water. However the first of the new generation of front-loaders, the Maytag's, brought he Maytag repairman out of retirement!
What most people don't know, is that you can buy a commercial front loader for not much more than the overpriced residential front loaders. When I bought my last washing machine, I bought a commercial Speed Queen top loader, and it was $600, and the smallest commercial front loader was $1100. The advantage of a commercial machine in a residential environment is that it is unlikely to ever require service.
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What if you run out of quarters???
"Is this an audience or an oil painting?" - Henny Youngman
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On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 17:12:41 GMT, "Steven M. Scharf"

I've got a GE commercial gas dryer I bought used 25 years ago. I hane no idea how old it actually is. So far, I've had to replace the drum slides, the drive belt, and the ignitor & ignitor clip. I'll keep it.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Now I can do what I enjoy: Large Format Photography www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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You got an Edsel in the driveway too???
;-]
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We bought the first generation of the Maytag Neptune in 1997 or 98. This one has the mechanical controls and has run flawlessly. We bought it because it seemed to be better built than the top-of-the-line top loader.
There were screws where the top loader had clips, there were screw clamps where the top loader had spring clamps, stainless steel where the top loader had plastic, and generally beefier components.
Absolutely no regrets.
-- Doug
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I'll add one more thing. When the appliance dealer delivered my refrigerator (a really big one), one guy unloaded it from the back of the truck himself, gently and quickly. Very impressive. He told his partner he preferred to do it alone for some reason. Everything went smoothly.
When the same two guys delivered the washer and dryer, they had a devil of a time getting the washer in the house and into the cellar. They both commented that for whatever reason, some front loading washers are a bitch to move, compared with top loaders. If you buy a front loader and intend to bring it home and install it yourself, you might want to have more than one helper around, just in case, and depending on your physical condition.
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We have an LG Tromm front-loader that's both washer and dryer in one unit. We first looked at it to save space, which it certainly does, but it has other benefits, too.
It uses very little water, especially on less-soiled cycles. Unlike some front-loaders, the water level never gets above the door seal, so you can stop it and add something mid-load.
It uses a different drying system than a standard tumble-dry machine, the clothes aren't continuously tumbled and don't fray off gobs of lint in every load. The other advantage of the drying system is that it doesn't need a blower vent, the water vapor is condensed and goes down the drain.
It has a range of spin speeds -- on the slowest setting it's gentle enough for heirloom patchwork quilts, at 1100RPM it gets towels almost dry enough to use without the dry cycle. And it's direct drive so it's very quiet. Ours is on the second floor of a 100-year- old house, simple wood plank flooring, 2x8 joists on 24" centers spanning 16 feet, so the floor is limber by modern standards, but you can't hear the washer running immediately below it in the living room.
It's extremely energy efficient compared to the traditional top-load washer and front-load dryer it replaced. It doesn't even use 240V for the dryer, a standard 110/10A outlet is plenty.
It has a "sanitary" cycle, with an internal heater that boosts the wash water to 167F. Great for my clothes after working in the crawlspace that used to be infested with stray cats ;-)
My favorite feature is that, since it's washer and dryer in one, you don't have to come back after the wash starts and put everything in the dryer. Load the washer, start it, and come back to a load of clean, dry clothes ready to put away.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
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How much does this unit cost?
And where did you buy it in the US?
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wrote:

If the dryer doesn't tumble, do the clothes come out wrinkled? I stayed at a friend's house in Germany years ago and observed the effects of a non-tumbling dryer. I was horrified at the baked-in wrinkles. I can deal with lint. Ironing, not so much.
Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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snipped-for-privacy@nyc.rr.com says...

The clothes tumble, but not constantly -- they're warmed and tumbled gently every few minutes to avoid setting wrinkles. It works quite well in my experience, some shirts that needed ironing after the standard dryer don't in this one.
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