Washer problem

My brand new washing machine (Roper-Whirlpool) is going to be swapped out on Friday. When I removed the clothes after the final spin I heard a strange sound that sounded like there was a coin in the tub. It turned out to be about a dozen small pieces of glass - about the size of a pea. I don't know where they came from but there may be more and they could cause damage to the innards. Lowes had no problem agreeing to an exchange.
---MIKE---
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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My brand new washing machine (Roper-Whirlpool) is going to be swapped out on Friday. When I removed the clothes after the final spin I heard a strange sound that sounded like there was a coin in the tub. It turned out to be about a dozen small pieces of glass - about the size of a pea. I don't know where they came from but there may be more and they could cause damage to the innards. Lowes had no problem agreeing to an exchange.
---MIKE---
Mike: Not to hijack the thread, but there has been a two generational feud in this household over a point which may be pertinent to your situation:
Is it the responsibility of the person who puts their dirty laundry in the hamper, or the responsibility of the person who puts said laundry into the washer and dryer to remove any and all "stuff" from said laundry?
We have two fully 180 different opinions. Or rather HAD.
I have said all my life that it was the person who puts it into the washing machine, and have paid the cost several times with odd things like ball point pens, felt tip pens, metal objects, et al. Just like it is the responsibility of the person who starts the lawnmower to check the oil, not the person who used it last.
Unnamed persons in the household insist it is the person who puts said laundry into the hamper that is responsible.
But that creates another conundrum. Is it legal, ethical, moral, or appropriate to pick up any article of obviously dirty clothing from where it lies and put it into the laundry for another person? Or MUST that person place said articles in said hamper, even though a sweep of living quarters would reveal obvious dirty personal articles?
Apparently not. In some households, a pair of underwear soiled with one quart of soilant could lay in the middle of the foyer entry of the house, and some members of the household would not pick it up and put it in the hamper, but merely navigate around it until a new pattern was made in the carpet. Apparently to do so would "rob the guilty (keyword) party of the joy and responsibility of the experience of actually cleaning up after themself.
Do you see where I'm going with this.
Complexity. Control "issues".
But, back to your situation. What was it? Oh yeah ..................
Depending on the complexity and codependence levels of your household and all diverse and extended participants, it would be difficult to establish if the said glass objects came from someone's pockets, or were the remainder of a manufacturing event, or just a plain human anomaly.
Can you provide a little more description of the glass pieces? Were they about 1/4" square, yet irregular, which would sound like a shattered piece of safety glass? Is it a top loader, or front loader with GLASS in the door? (Might have come from another unit on the assembly line.)
Of all things to find in the washer, pieces of glass are highly irregular. I keep all sorts of things in my pockets from metric sockets to dead frogs, but never glass.
I finally broke my MIL of her insistence of NOT looking in my pant pockets by leaving two 5" WWII military .50 cal. Browning Machine Gun shells (deactivated, and powder and primer removed, of course) in my coveralls. She heard them in the dryer.
"Oh, my, how did those get in there? Thank you. It was a very good thing that these did not go off, or your dryer would have been a victim of war. I've been looking for these"
Sometimes it takes what it takes.
I'd like to hear about your glass shards in a little more detail. Therein may lie the answer.
Family nuances aside ............ Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, is coincidental.
Steve ;-)
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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The glass was not sharp. It had to be in the washer to start with because there was nothing in my laundry (which was only underwear and socks). There was nothing that had any pockets. I showed the glass to the people at Lowes. As far as responsibility is concerned, I would think both the person putting the laundry in the hamper and the person loading the machine should check the pockets for "stuff".
---MIKE---
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Nov 1, 5:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

You would think so, but reality is that in a hurry both persons can miss some things, like wallets in rear pockets of jeans, leading to a replacement driver's license.
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On 11/1/2011 6:17 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

I just washed my wallet last week. :-( Drivers license is plastic so no harm done. Actually everything stayed in the wallet and survived the washing, even a couple business cards and paper notes.
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Steve B wrote:

In general, the blame for an accident lies with the person who had the last clear chance to avoid it.
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