WASHER LID SWITCH


Since these go out more than my back...
How can I circumvent the switch?
It's a safety feature I don't need.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

In my experience, these are simple momentary SPST normally open switches. Cut the two wires off the switch and connect them together with a wire nut.
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

Thanks.
You just saved me $30.
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On 19 Dec 2006 14:32:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

These are there for people too dumb to keep their hands out of the machine wihile it is running. You should be OK. Don't let us down ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I promise never to place it in the stream of commerce. That would be wrong.
Since I am the only one in the house, no one will be affected by my decision to forego a safety switch. And, since I treat my washer like a garbage disposal, I am surprised it has lasted this long (5 years). I intend to run it into the ground.
I made this decision based on the fact that every lid switch I have ever had has needed repairs and it runs about $100 for some butt crack to come to the house for 5 minutes. I am figuring these companies stay up nights thinking of ways to get our hard earned money. So, we must engage the gray matter to defend against them.
Another trick is hiding the screws that hold the console and cabinet together, but I got clear directions on my particular model.
This is my first try and I figure at worst, some butt crack will have to bail out my repair so I am no worse off.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

One of those things I've always wondered - how many injuries caused by the absence of this switch were reported before this became a requirement?
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

Some attorney sued and the manufacturer learned it could make a few hundred million dollars repairing them. It helped defray the costs of that worthless lawyers that are ruining society and for which we all pay.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

The funny (in an ironic sort of way) part is that the manufacturers make these parts readily available to the incompetent DIYer who then, in the absence of a Professional, replaces the switch without unplugging the washer (the old switch was faulty, so he had no indication that the damn thing was turned on)
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

First, you unplug the washer. That's always the first step.
Then, you use a ohm meter.
I am just learning and a girl.
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

1. Unplug Machine. 2. Remove cabinet and console. 3. Check with ohm meter 4. If it's the not switch, check about ten other possibilities including the coupler.
Very common is lid switch and coupler in my direct drive two speed.
This is my first time but I have managed to DIY every thing. It takes some thought, reading, and my handyman who I "supervise".
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

No idea on numbers, but I do know of one -- back in the '60s a basketball at Oklahoma State University was washing in the dorm and his load became unbalanced during the spin cycle (probably shoes, or some such, I don't recall). He attempted to fix it before the machine stopped and got caught. It took his arm off at the shoulder. He was lucky to get it reattached and actually had reasonable mobility although never was able to play again. I was at another Big 8 school at the time and recall the story, but no longer can remember his name.
Upshot is, be careful if you do disable it.
I, like some others have mentioned, in having had top loading washers for 40+ years now, have never had one of these fail.
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

What difference? If only one child in Bangladesh is saved, it's worth it (according to some).
It's for the children, therefore you are not allowed to question the issue.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Hmmm, That is funny. In my life time I never had washer lid switch failure. If it ever did, I'd modify it to use magnetic reed switch, Hall generator or IR sensor triggered switch, LOL!
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I had one that failed as well. All worked ok when bypassed.
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Al Bundy wrote:

I am new at this sort of thing and female, but I really enjoy this DIY action.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in wrote:

Godof7s: Related to SevenOf9? :-)
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Just got done replacing the door switch on my ol' Kenmore / Whirlpool washer. First failure in 10 years. Easy enough to replace -- hardest part was getting the cabinet back onto the frame after I did the repair. Had to pull out a couple of the better swear words to get that sucker back into place.
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