Washer/dryer not drying too well

We have a Zanussi washer/dryer WJS 1265 W which is not drying as well as it did when new (it's now about three years old). It takes two goes to get stuff dry, ie one go of 2.31min and one of 1.39min. We are not overloading the machine - eg one bath sheet and one hand towel dry weight only 2 1/4 lbs (5 Kg). The filter is clear. The spinner seems to work OK. There seems to be suspiciously little electricity consumption when the machine is drying. (The electric meter seems to move no more quickly than when the machine's not drying).
What, do you think, is the likely reason for this? What are the mechanics of the drying function? Where does the heat come from in the drying process? Is there a fan or blower of some kind?
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We have a Zanussi washer/dryer WJS 1265 W which is not drying as well as it did when new (it's now about three years old). It takes two goes to get stuff dry, ie one go of 2.31min and one of 1.39min. We are not overloading the machine - eg one bath sheet and one hand towel dry weight only 2 1/4 lbs (5 Kg). The filter is clear. The spinner seems to work OK. There seems to be suspiciously little electricity consumption when the machine is drying. (The electric meter seems to move no more quickly than when the machine's not drying).
What, do you think, is the likely reason for this? What are the mechanics of the drying function? Where does the heat come from in the drying process? Is there a fan or blower of some kind?
Many thanks for any help.
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but here's something you seem to have overlooked: Disconnect the large, ribbed flexible plastic hose that runs between the back of the dryer and the vent built into the wall and seeing if you maybe have a whole boatload of lint and other assorted fluff built up in there? And while you've got the hose off, stick your hand up into the hole in the wall vent and make sure there's not a huge ball of fluff blocking that, too. I can almost guarantee you probably do, and once you clean out your venting, you'll be drying up a storm in quick time just like God and the Maytag Man intended.
If you happen to be one of those unfortunate folks whose dryer is vented the old-fashioned way with aluminum/tin ductwork instead of ribbed hose, rotsa ruck unbolting and cleaning out *that* puppy.
BTW for those who *never* clean out their dryer vent hose at least once a year at miniumum, it's not entirely unknown for blockages of dryer fluff to pose a fire hazard. Personally, I can think of more-dignified reasons for a house to burn down.
AJS
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wrote:

IRC 2000 (International Residential Code 2000),Chapter 15, Exhaust Systems, Section M1501 Clotes Dryers Exhaust states in part, "Exhaust ducts shall be constructed of minimum 0.016 inch thick rigid metal ducts, having sm The minimum ooth enterior surfaces with joints runnng in the direction of air flow. Flexible transition ducts used to connect the dryer to the exhaust duct system shll be limited to single lengths, not to exceed 8 feet in length and shall be listed and labeled in accordance ith UL 2158A. Transition ducts shall not be concealed within construction. The minimum diameter of the exhaust duct shall be as recommended by the manufacturer and shall be at leastthe diameter of the appliance outlet. The maximum length of a clotes dryer exhaust duct shall not exdeed 25 feet and the length shall be reduced 2.5 feet for each 45 degree bend and 5 feet for each 90 degree bend.
Tom Baker
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net (Tom Baker) wrote:

OK, point being what -- other than either metal or flex duct is OK to use?
AJS
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Hi,
I don't have specific repair info on this UK style appliance, but some links from below may offer some places that would know... http://www.applianceaid.com/UK_appliance_links.html

So this is a new development.

Bad/grounded heating element?

Usually an element inside the dryer.

Normally yes, one to draw in air and move the air across the element and to blow it through the dryer and out the vent pipe/exhaust.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 06:13:43 -0000, "David"

I'm not familiar with that machine, but my experience has been that most of my 'slow dry' problems have been loose belts causing the clothes to not spin out dry enough after the wash cycle.
Checking for blockage of the vent is also a good idea as someone else has pointed out.
Jim
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On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 06:13:43 -0000, "David"

Debris in the ductwork, clogged vent or lint trapped in the dryer itself can reduce drying efficiency. Inspect/clean these out regularly. Smooth duct pipes are better with moving air and staying clean than the flex corrugated types.
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Thanks for all the suggestions, guys, but the machine is actually a condenser model, so there's no external ducting to get clogged up. This is not to say, of course that there's no internal blockage or constriction - I'll look into that.
Thanks again, but any further suggestions (and explanations of the mechanisms) would be welcome.
Regards
David
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This may help others looking at this newsgroup:
I didn't think for one moment that I'd get any help from Zanussi, (hence the "cri-de-coeur" to this newsgroup), but, in fact, the telephone helpline for the UK provided the following information:
There is a separate heater element for the drying process and warm air is propelled through the machine by means of a small, very quiet fan.
The heater element is rated at 700W, so the fact that the electric meter wasn't registering points strongly in that direction.
Cost from Zanussi's official suppliers is 42+ for the element and a fixed charge of 59 to have it fitted.
I'm trying other suppliers, although at the moment I've been waiting for over an hour to get the promised call-back!
It's interesting that most, if not all, replies to my original enquiry emanate from the USA! (I am resident in the UK as you may now have guessed) - thank you guys, and warm greetings!
And (as they say in the trade) y'all take care!
Regards
David
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This may help others looking at this newsgroup:
I didn't think for one moment that I'd get any help from Zanussi, (hence the "cri-de-coeur" to this newsgroup), but, in fact, the telephone helpline for the UK provided the following information:
There are two heater elements for the drying process, combined in one assembly, and warm air is propelled through the machine by means of a small, very quiet fan.
The heater elements are rated at 700W - together or each I'm not sure - so the fact that the electric meter wasn't registering points strongly in that direction.
Cost from Zanussi's official suppliers is 42+ for the assembly and a fixed charge of 59 to have it fitted.
Other suppliers quote me at 59+
It's interesting that most, if not all, replies to my original enquiry emanate from the USA! (I am resident in the UK as you may now have guessed) - thank you guys, and warm greetings!
And (as they say in the trade) y'all take care!
Regards
David
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