Washer and drier on same circuit

Does Code allow a washer and drier on the same circuit? I've got a European style washer with a 240 volt plug (NEMA 6-20P) and I have just bought its matching drier which has the North American drier plug. I was thinking of replacing the North American drier cord and plug with a 240 volt plug and using it on the same circuit as the washer. Are there any code issues here? I may have to boost the breaker and Romex back to the board as I will be more than doubling the load from 2300 (washer) by adding 3070 (drier) for a max of 5370 watts. So I'm thinking I may need a 25 or 30 A breaker.
Any thoughts?
Jimbo
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

run a seperate circuit for the washer.
it will cost less.
dryer shouldnt be fused for more than its maximum current needs
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tks.
This is all in an unfinished basement so I can run anything I need without too much trouble.
Can I ask why you suggest a seperate circuit given that I have an outlet and spare outlet right there?
Jimbo
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If the dryer were to have a problem and draw more current than it is rated, the over-sized breaker would likely not trip until the drier was on fire.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never believed in arguements like the above. Dryers generally fault by having open circuit components or dead shorts, such as the heating element breaking open and its ends dropping to a ground point. That results in a dead short that will blow any reasonable breaker. They also have overtemp thermostats that cut power in cases of overheating.
To buy the above posters logic, every item in a house should be on a breaker with just higher capacity than the normal current need. Thus you better not have your 60 watt table lamp on a 15 amp circuit, you better not have your 700 watt refrigerator on a 20 amp circuit, etc, etc.
Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And you'd need some .02A breakers for LED holiday lights.
--
42 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here's more information on my issue. I bought the washer some years back with the NEMA 6-20P plug on it and so I ran a 240 volt circuit for it. Recently, I picked up the matching drier but was surprised to see a regular drier plug on it. This also came with a box which has a drier outlet, a NEMA 6-20R outlet both double fused and a cord with a drier plug on it! Clearly, this was intended for people buying both appliances at the same time and having a drier outlet available to them. I'm kind of in the opposite situation..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
why would a washer draw so many watts?? does it have a water heater built in possibly?
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. This model only has a single water feed old water feed and if hot water is needed, its heated "on board".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Forgive my confusing typo above :) What I meant to say was that this machine has only a single water connection and is normally connected to the cold water feed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.