Wash machine screens

Once again my wash machine is down due to a clogged screen on the cold water line.
1. Is there some way to pull that screen out of the fitting (it is on the machine this time, not in the hose) to clean it?
2. What would be the results if I just yanked it and left it out? Damage to the water valve?
The material that plugs it is from my well, extremely fine sand that just barely doesn't pass through that fine screen. Takes about year or two before it builds up enough to need cleaning.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you can remove the screen without damaging the valve, you can buy a screen that replaces the washer in the end of the hose that hooks to the water supply valve (bib). Keep a couple on hand for future replacement. They can be seen here http://shop.store.yahoo.com/frigidaire/unwasfilhos.html or http://shop.store.yahoo.com/frigidaire/unwashosscre.html . When you install the screen in the hose, the dome should face the water supply bib.
Frank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank K. wrote:

DOH! Why didn't I think of that. Those were on my previous machine.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I forgot to mention they are available at Lowe's, Home Depot or local hardware stores.
Frank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank K. wrote:

if they clog often (for once is enough) remove the screen in teh hose and attach a in-line filter that has a removeable screen for easy cleaning and larger so will not clog as often either.
The best in-line filter I have found is one model I found that is used on Drip irrigation, found it at lowes, has hose style connections and a thrid screw cap where the filter can be removed and cleaned when needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you don't have a whole house filter, get one. That sand is doing damage to other things. I once saw a domestic hot water coil full of brown glass. I had to replace the whole coil. After investigation, it turned out there was sand in the well water. The HO put a filter on and never had it happen again.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leaving the screens out may cause sediment to get into the washer's water valve and cause the valve to leak. Replacing the machine's valve can run $100 if you do it yourself to more than $200 if you call someone in to do it. Get the screens at Lowes or HD. Get the finest screens you can find and use them on both sides of the water hoses (as a backup in case something crazy happens). I learned this the hard way.
Gordon

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob wrote:

Yes, it does cause problems. Other than the machine no mechanical ones so far but I do flush out the (hot)water heater at least annually. The pressure tank doesn't seem to collect it as the house feed comes out at the bottom. I really don't want to go the whole house filter route as there just isn't that much of it and it just adds one more nuisance maintenance item.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is best to do double-duty with screens in the valve itself, and backup at the faucet end of the hoses with hose screens as mentioned elsewhere in this thread. You can purchase replacement screens for the fill valve at an appliance parts store, then install them with a long socket, such as 1/2" size. Sometimes it is a bit difficult to get the screen seated correctly. You may have to use gentle pressure from a small screwdriver to press in one side if it starts going cockeyed. Or, just replace the whole valve if you can get to it (should be about $30, not $100 for the part).
By the way, for everyone else, even if you don't have problems with your valve, it is best to install hose screens. Everyone should have them. This the best insurance against overflow due to debris in the valve. New washing machines rarely come with hose screens for the hoses, but replacement hoses sometimes do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.