wash hair in kitchen sink: disposall does chop up hair, yes?

Just checking:
If a woman, say, washes her hair in the kitchen sink, I'd assume that whatever hair (falls out and) goes down the drain *does* get chopped-up by the disposall.
(and thus have less chance of fouling the exit pipe, etc.)
But I ask just in case I'm totally wrong, that, say, hair is so thin that it just slips past the blades, whole, and clogs pipes just as it would in a shower that had no special hair-catching thing over the drain.
Thanks,
David
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I suggest you email the manufacturer. There are no blades in a disposal, only metal tabs that slam the food against the rough surface of the device, causing the food to be broken down . Hair is soft and pliable, so it may not have any effect on it

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041127 2232 - RBM posted:

Hair will also probably wind itself around the exposed part of the disposal blade and eventually stop the tabs from working. It would be best to use a strainer in the sink to catch as much of the hair as possible and then clean it out of the strainer after washing.
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A lot of people think a disposal 'purée' the food that goes down the drain. In fact, most do little more than what might be done by putting the same food in a blender for about 10 seconds. Unlike a blender that will continue working on the same food for as long as you let it run, food down the disposal washes on down the drain as soon as it will slip past the grinding blades. It is rarely any finer than perhaps cole slaw.
Human hair will act about the same as the 'hair' in a banana peal or celery - it will wind around whatever parts it can and eventually clog.
Best advice, use a strainer and catch the hair before it gets down the drain at all. Good advice for a kitchen sink, or the bathtub.

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From the replies, it seems the safest place for "a woman, say" to wash her hair would be the shower or tub. :-)
- Dugie

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On 11/28/2004 12:08 PM US(ET), Dugie took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

smelly, slimy, wet rat looking thing, has to be pulled out on occasion. :-) Have them wash their hair in the dog washing tub out on the deck. :-)

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041128 1208 - Dugie posted:

Yes, that is a good place to wash hair. My shower drain has a cross piece about 1/2" down from the surface that catches a lot of hair. About every couple of months I use a long nose pliers and pull the hair out of the drain cross piece. I imagine some of the hair goes down the drain, but generally this cross piece gets a lot of it. If I don't clean it out, it will just plug up and the water will just barely drain out.
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Word to the wise: if "a woman, say" uses a comb while washing "her" hair in the shower, most of the hair that would go down the drain, ends up on the comb, and can be thrown away. Works best with conditioner.
Keeps you from having to pull that ... stuff ... up from the drain.
JSH, woman
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<snip>
At last, a woman's wise input, and a smart woman, too. I don't know of anyone who uses a comb while in the shower, haven't heard of it.
Julie, I'm going to try using a comb when washing "my" hair. Cause we have that ... stuff .... in the drain too. Thank you for the idea. I may use "conditioner" as well. :-)
- Dugie
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<< If a woman, say, washes her hair in the kitchen sink, >>
Bad idea. If she sheds a lot, send her down to the local beauty parlor. It will likely be cheaper than having your plumber visit every few weeks. <G>
Joe
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David Combs wrote:

Just in case you need to hear it again: Don't do that! <g>
Disposals don't handle long skinny stuff well. Do you ever frequent bars? If so, you probably know what a "Sip-stix" is. The (dead serious) advice in their restaurant kitchen is that the disposal can and will digest a small animal if given the chance, but will choke on a few dozen of those little red plastic buggers. The waitresses toss 'em when they empty the drink glasses, our dishwashers fish them out of the mix before it hits the drain. The owner just hates wearing that plumber's hat.
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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On 27 Nov 2004 22:07:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

A disposal may cut up some hair, but the remaining will like go down the drain. You can purchase a hair screen to prevent that from happening.
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Not the answers I expected -- thought surely the hair would be chopped up.
Sure sure glad I asked the question!!!!
Thanks so much!
David
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