Warm cold water

I live in central Texas where summer temps often reach triple digits. Every summer the cold water gets warm. A few years ago when we had an exceptionally hot summer with temps aroud 110 degrees that lasted for a couple of weeks, the cold water got warm enough that I could take a comfortable shower without using any "hot" water at all.
Does this happen everywhere where the summers are this hot?
Why does it happen? Is it that the pipes aren't buried deep enough?
Just curious. Thanks in advance.
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8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
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I live near Chicago and it doesn't happen here! My pipes have to be buried below frost line around 42". I would guess that your water company doesn't have these restrictions as you never get ground freezing weather.

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Suzie-Q wrote:

Are the pipes running through your attic, or are they exposed to sunlight or heat?
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The ground temps get high enough in summer to warm the water. You also may be getting water from an above-ground reservoir. Here in Central Florida,the water gets very warm,too.
You can't bury the pipes deep enough to keep the water cold.(cost- effectively)
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Jim Yanik
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Yep, in fact there are those big water tank things that hold the water up in the air. They are not insulated.
Temps rise in lakes and reservoirs as well.
My grandmother, who retired to Tucson, and came back to visit Chicago, commented on how nice it was to get cold water out of the tap during the summer.
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clipped

Yeah, and I remember thinking Lake Michigan was warm to swim in when it was 70 degrees in the water. The Gulf gets warmer than my bath water :o)
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Of course, ground temps, im zone 5 water gets to 70 in summer and 33-34 at -15 in winter, it sure increases our water heating bill in winter.
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The gulf temperature 60 miles south of Tampa is 87 today.

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DA,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
Water pipes in the south west are high in the ground compared with the rest of the country. I live in AZ and yes water temps climb in the summer and fall in the winter. Where do you think all of that solar radiation goes, INTO THE AIR?
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That happens to me here is northern California. I am inland from Oakland about 50 miles (Oakley, if anyone knows where that is) and it gets hot in the summer here too. Our local water company takes water right out of the San Joaquin river. It is piped overland where the sun can warm the water in the pipes quite a bit before it gets to the treatment plants. I can remember when I filled my swimming pool back in late May 1987, after running the water for over 24 hours the temperature of the water in the pool was 77-78 degrees. I was curious one other time and measured water temp at 79 degrees right out of the hose (after it had run for about 20 min).
Wayne

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Sue:
S > I live in central Texas where summer temps often reach triple S > digits. Every summer the cold water gets warm. A few years ago S > when we had an exceptionally hot summer with temps aroud 110 S > degrees that lasted for a couple of weeks, the cold water got S > warm enough that I could take a comfortable shower without using S > any "hot" water at all. S > S > Does this happen everywhere where the summers are this hot? S > S > Why does it happen? Is it that the pipes aren't buried deep S > enough? S > S > Just curious. Thanks in advance.
My guess is the pipes aren't buried as deep as they are here (below frostline). Your supply pipes (not only the ones in your yard but the ones under the streets) don't need to be buried as deeply as you (generally) don't get extended freezing conditions in Texas. The soil warms, transferring heat to the water distribution pipes. The water supply (river, lake) may also be warmer, adding to the 'problem'.
The bad news is since you can take a shower I don't think the problem is something you can correct locally, at your home -- I'm thinking it's a neighbourhood- or city-wide problem (ask). The good news is you should be able to save a lot of money by not having to use your gas or electric water heater!
..There is another possibility, and that is somehow hot water is getting mixed with your cold. Sometimes a mixer valve will be used to keep toilet tanks from sweating (cold water in tank causes moisture- laden air in bathroom to condense on tank). Another possible source would be if you had a recirculating pump hooked to the wrong return pipe. Seems like these would be more of a year-round problem.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Jan 13 1910: first public radio transmission: Metro Opera House, NYC.
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RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
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